Nutrition Comments (0) |

Liquid Diet for Marathon Recovery

Recovery food for marathon should be easy to digest, so a liquid diet might be the best thing for you, writes Nandini Reddy.

After finishing a tiring race it is important to reach for the right nutrition to aid your recovery. A liquid diet might be gentler on the stomach instead of an all-you-eat meal. The bright neon coloured electrolytes are great but there is also an array of choices that are available from natural sources.

How to choose your recovery drink?

A recovery drink should ideally be consumed 20-30 minutes post the run. If you wait longer then that means that your body won’t repair itself fast enough. The choice of drink should allow for the most efficient recovery of your muscles. It should give you the right nutrients to restore your energy levels. Milk is a natural protein that you can consider having post your race. If you want carbs then you can get them from fruit or vegetable sugars. Sports drinks are also heavy on your wallet so these natural options are more economical to consider. If you don’t like artificial sports drinks then there rare plenty of options that you can consider that are naturally available.

Coconut Water – Coconut water is rich in potassium and is perfect to maintain water balance in the body and also assist the muscles in relaxing optimally. The natural sugars in the water give your body enough carbs before and after a race. It is best had either 60 mins before the run or after.

Chocolate Milk – This drink isn’t just a kid favourite but is also a great meal option for post-run recovery for marathon runners. It speeds up recovery and is better than any sports drinks you might consider. The mix is rich in calcium and Vitamin D that assist in muscle recovery.

Vegetable Juice – A 100% vegetable juice that leaves in the fibre is a great recovery drink. The fibre is light enough on your stomach and the nutrients and anti-oxidants that you will get will help relieve the stress. These juices have more potassium and sodium that sports drinks, making them the better choice.

Banana Shake – For the vegans you can try a shake made from coconut milk and bananas. Its a great alternative if you are lactose intolerant also. It gives you enough carbs and proteins that are essential for a post-run recovery.

Tea/Coffee – Caffeine will provide you with a jolt that you need to boost your running performance. Tea is rich in anti-oxidants and drinking a cup of tea or coffee 45 mins before or after a run will energize you.

These drinks are refreshing and can also recharge your body. So give the shot after your next race!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

 

An irregular runner who has run in dry, wet, high altitude and humid conditions. Loves to write a little more than run so now is the managing editor of Finisher Magazine.

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Seniors Comments (0) |

The Man who ran Forever

Legendary Senior Runner, Ed Whitlock is remembered for his indomitable spirit by Capt Seshadri

It was a warm summer day in Toronto, on March 13, 2017. It was a day of mourning for the marathon runners of the world. The day marked the unfortunate demise, due to prostate cancer, of a master athlete, just a week past his 86th birthday, the only runner to complete a series of marathons at an age past 80, in less than 4 hours. RIP Ed Whitlock!

Born on March 6, 1931, this English-origin Canadian did not start running again until he was 41, concentrating at the time on middle-distance running, and after several years recording best times of 1:59.9 for the 800 metres and 4:02.5 for the 1500 metres. His initiation into marathon running came at age 48, from a spat with his 14-year old son, who Ed could not dissuade from competing but, rather, ran alongside and casually completed the course in 2:31:23. Now he was bitten by the running bug!

Well into his 60s, he turned his attention to road racing. However, it was as late as in 2003, when at age 72, he ran the 26.2 miler in 2:59:49. Two years later, the time was 2:58:40, creating the record for the oldest man to run a marathon in under 3 hours. The number crunchers confirm that, if extrapolated in age with a 20-year old runner, this time would have been equivalent to 2:03:57, probably one of the fastest marathons of all time!

Fifteen minutes at eighty years; that was the improvement Whitlock made to the world record for his age category, with an astonishing time of 3:25:43 at the April 2011 Rotterdam Marathon. Not satisfied with this superhuman effort, he improved the timing in October the same year, at the Toronto Waterfront Marathon, to 3:15:54. Nothing could stop this remarkable athlete, least of all age. In October 2016, all of 85 years old, he became the oldest marathoner to complete the course in less than 4 hours, with a run of 3:56:34, once again at Toronto.

Ed’s running career and training program are unusual and unorthodox. His running shoes are worn out and outdated. His running vest is probably a couple of decades and a half old. He has never consulted a coach or trainer and has no records of his training mileage. And, unimaginable to any hardcore runner, he had no masseur, did not do weight training or stretching and abhorred supplements of any kind. What probably worked in his favour is an extraordinary lung capacity and a lean mass. But, above all, a dedication to win against time, against the track and against the body clock. With a cemetery as a running ground, Ed trained all alone, running around it for over 3.5 hours at a time, day after day.

Aging is an argument among the medical fraternity when it comes to Ed Whitlock. His running records at such an advanced age have prompted scientists and geriatric specialists to take a relook at the processes of aging and athletic performance. However, Ed’s own philosophy is quite simple. “I believe people can do far more than they think they can. You have to be idiot enough to try it.”

In a fitting tribute to a senior runner, Ed Whitlock, the super marathoner with undying stamina and indomitable spirit, was inducted into the Milton Sports Hall of Fame in 2016.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

 

Capt Seshadri Sreenivasan is a former armed forces officer with over 30 years experience in marketing. He also a consulting editor with a leading publishing house. He is a co-author of the best selling biography of astronaut Sunita Williams.

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Motivation Comments (0) |

Hydration & Running

Runner need to watch their hydration, writes Deepthi Velkur

Drinking enough water is of paramount importance not only during summer months but all year round for runners.  When you run your body heat rises, and this saps the water content in your body through excessive sweating. Hydrating the body well with fluids is essential before, during and post a run as lack of proper hydration leads to dehydration (fatigue, headache, muscle cramping ), exhaustion and heat stroke.

So how much water do you need? There is no definitive answer as different people require different levels of hydration during a run as some people tend to sweat more than others. Temperature and climatic conditions also play a major part for runners. A good balance of water and sodium levels help ward off fatigue and enhance your running performance.

Pre-Hydrate to run fast

Keeping yourself well hydrated a few days prior to the run is essential. A good indication to know your well hydrated is when the urine is pale yellow in color. Avoid diuretics such as tea, coffee, and alcoholic beverages as they dehydrate you quickly. It is good to hydrate yourself well before bedtime if you need to race the next morning. Drinking 500ml of water and adding one ORS\sports tablet to it, boosts your sodium levels. This should be had an hour or two before you start your run.

Hydration during the run

A simple strategy to keep in mind while running is to drink when you feel thirsty. Strenuous running generates 20 times more heat and it is important to dispel this heat to regulate and stabilize the body temperature. Hydrate with 100-200ml of water every 15 minutes. For longer runs, substitute with a sports drink to replace lost sodium and other minerals(electrolytes).

Sweat Test

Weigh yourself pre and post-run and assess the weight loss as this determines the current intake of water. If the weight loss is 2% of your body weight, that’s a sign your water intake should be more on your next run.

Mind over Matter

Most importantly be conscious of your water consumption and never to over hydrate. Forcing yourself to drink more fluids, makes you feel uneasy while running. Over-hydration can also lead to gastrointestinal distress and in some extreme cases water intoxication or hyponatremia. So it’s true when they say you can’t have too much of anything, not even water.

Re-hydrate after running

Hydrating post a run is of equal importance as much as it is before and during a run. Replenishing your body with fluids like 500ml of water or sports drink is crucial as most of the runners tend to skip which leads to dehydration.

For runners, proper hydration during a run makes a vast difference to fluid levels in the body thereby improving efficiency and overall performance.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

 

Deepthi Velkur is a former sprinter who is trying her hand at various sports today. A tennis fanatic, who believes that sleep should never be compromised.

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Motivation Comments (0) |

Stay in shape with Running

Running is an excellent way to stay healthy and be in shape for any age, writes Deepthi Velkur.

The benefits of running outweigh the risks and helps in reducing the many impacts of aging to a great extent. Seasoned runners tend to have better mobility, weight control, muscle strength, bone density and an overall sense of well-being. According to a recent Stanford university study, frequent runners tend to experience ailments such as heart disease, diabetes, neurological ailments, high blood pressure on an average 16 years later than non-runners. This makes it a great sport to take up at any age and especially for seniors its a great way to stay fit.

Here are some simple pointers to keep in mind if you want to start of your running career in your golden years:

Set realistic goals- Keep your goals small and attainable. There is a loss of muscle strength, aerobic capacity, higher recovery time and rest required as you get older; as a result, you cannot train and race at the same intensity. However, endurance runners who continue running into their older years have a much-reduced muscle loss when compared to inactive people of the same age. Adjust your expectations, pick realistic goals and continue to be active and committed to running.

Check with a professional-If your new to running or taken to running after a long break from being physically fit, checking with a doctor or a healthcare professional is a good idea and helps you build a customized training plan. Senior runners should always take the advice of a physician and the guidance of the coach before endeavoring into running.

Proper running gear- Choosing the right running gear is more important than just your comfort. With the body loosening up as you age, selecting the right type and size of clothing as well ensuring proper running shoes with adequate cushioning is imperative. You will find specialized running shoes in the market so get out and do some shopping.

Strength Training- Regular strength training helps in a slower decline of the muscle mass and this becomes very important when you are taking up an aerobic sport like running. Improved muscle mass helps the muscles to absorb more impact caused due to running and less stress on the joints. A mixed workout which includes swimming, cycling, yoga, simple leg and core exercises such as squats, planks, push-ups, and lunges help in your running performance and improves injury resistance when you are a senior runner.

Balance and flexibility- You can work on improving your balance by standing on one leg for 30 seconds or some yoga exercises like the tree and eagle pose. Legs, back, hips, and shoulders feel stiffer since they lose elasticity with time. Regular stretching and yoga especially post running improve flexibility.

Injury Prevention and proper recovery time-Slight change in body signals should not be ignored especially for senior runners and must be given immediate attention. Ensure your fitness plan includes adequate rest as it gives the body time to strengthen itself. Stretching before and after runs is equally important. Regular massages and foam rolling is also beneficial.

Follow these simple tips and you can hit the road with a calmer and focused mind as a senior runner. Running goes a long way in helping you achieve a balanced state of physical and mental well-being, so what are you waiting for – lace up those shoes and run free.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

 

Deepthi Velkur is a former sprinter who is trying her hand at various sports today. A tennis fanatic, who believes that sleep should never be compromised.

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Training Comments (0) |

Quick Fixes to improve your Running

If you want to keep advancing as a marathoner then it is important to become an efficient runner, writes Nandini Reddy.

Runners are always looking to improve timing, speed and technique. The more efficient they become – the faster they progress as runners. In the recent times there have been several new innovative running techniques that have evolved and been adopted by runners across the world. But aside from extensive training schedule changes you can also look to improve your running efficiency sneaking in a few quick fixes.

Learn to Sprint

Sprinting can become a part of your training schedule with ease. You will need to add sprinting at maximum intensity to your training schedule at least 3 times a week. Why does this help? Essentially because sprinting pushes you to your limits of capacity and your energy is purely converted to speed. In the process your stride improves and thus boosts your running technique. Start with doing 5-10 sprints in 10-15 second bursts. This you can alter or vary according to your running level.

Train Barefoot

Most running shoes come with extra cushioning and are fixed with more technology than your laptops. But this extra compensation from the shoe means you don’t pay attention to your strides because your shoes compensates when you over-stride. While this might not be noticeable in the short run, you will notice that you are tiring out faster in the long run. Getting the right stride length is crucial to becoming a more efficient runner. It also reduces the risk of injury and conserves your energy. If you find barefoot too uncomfortable then opt for shoes that have less cushioning so that you can run comfortably in the right stride length.

Get Flexible

Our jobs today do not let us move around much. Most of us are sitting 90% of the time at office. This can stiffen your hip flexors and that can ruin your running efficiency. When the hip flexors are tight, it makes it hard to push off and your stride get affected and you will also consequently use more energy to generate the same thrust. So remember to stretch and work out your hips so that there is improved flexibility.

Squat it

Squats can strengthen muscle groups that are important for running. Work in at least 3 days of strength training and ensure you do squats. Strengthening the muscles means that you can run faster and remain injury free. Watch your squatting technique so that you can get the maximum effect.

Lean it

Leaning slightly forward can make a world of difference. The slight forward lean is a technique that skiers use to engage their whole body. This allows for better form and makes running slightly less tiresome. This also prevents you from sinking into your hips. The idea is the maintain a straight back and then following the skier slight forward lean is a good running form.

Simple changes can help you run faster and longer and make your runs more enjoyable.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

 

An irregular runner who has run in dry, wet, high altitude and humid conditions. Loves to write a little more than run so now is the managing editor of Finisher Magazine.

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Featured Comments (0) |

Breaking through the wall

Our Guest Columnist, Shailja Sridhar shares her thoughts on how to break the wall during a marathon.

“Hitting the wall” means running out of energy during a race. Another word commonly used for it is “bonking”. It can happen during any endurance event but most commonly used for marathons. Scientific research says that we have only about 1,500/2,000 calories stored as glycogen in our muscles and liver and it is usually over by 30 kms and then we are dependent on other sources of energy. Glycogen is a form of glucose stored in our muscles for energy. As fat metabolism requires more oxygen and takes more energy, we cannot depend on it during a race. It becomes impossible to sustain the pace if one is trying to burn fat as a source of energy. The only option is to ensure that the body is supplied with an adequate amount of simple carbohydrates and sugars to supply energy to the muscles. Proper nutrition prior to the race is necessary and so is carb loading before an endurance event to ensure that we have sufficient glycogen stores available for us during the race.

Experiencing “The Wall”

I had my first encounter with the dreaded Wall in Tokyo Marathon 2017. I started out too fast thanks to being in the sub-elite corral along with some really fast runners. I began to pay for all that initial enthusiasm after 30km. My legs were cramping and my pace became slower and slower. I had to dig deep and really push to finish at the same time as Mumbai Marathon 6 weeks ago, which is pretty bad considering the nicer weather in Tokyo. It was a good lesson for me and made me realize that even after 10 marathons, I had a lot to learn. There are myriad reasons why one hits the wall between 30 and 35 km and one of them is starting out too fast. Also, the glycogen stores are totally depleted by then and if the race nutrition has not been systematic then there is no energy left for the final push.

Here is why runners hit the wall –

 Lack of proper nutrition:

We need to consume carbs regularly and from the initial part of the race. It is not right to wait till one feels thirsty or hungry because then it’s already too late. The body needs to be hydrated and supplied with fuel from the beginning so it’s good to try and ensure that you get some sports drink or simple carbs at every aid station. Initially one does not feel like drinking water or consuming anything because it feels unnecessary. One has to remember that waiting till later will not help but hinder the race performance for amateur runners. I am not talking about the professional runners who are used to a very hard training regimen and different conditions. Even the professional runners have their race nutrition planned in advance and always remember to consume sufficient amount of calories to ensure optimum performance. A race is not the right time to worry about sugar intake but work at getting those simple sugars so they hit the bloodstream quickly. Candies, chocolates, juice, dates, sports drinks, bananas, oranges, potatoes… anything which can be eaten easily and digested quickly is good. Gels are popular amongst runners as a quick source of energy but we have to remember to consume water so it can be absorbed by the body.

Running at a fast pace:

Starting out at an unrealistically fast pace which is not sustainable for the entire distance is a common amateur mistake and even the best runners are not immune to it. A consistent pace during a marathon is desirable but not always easy to manage. Enough of us have made that mistake during races thanks to the initial excitement during the event. It is difficult to hold back but we must if we want to manage the entire distance without bonking. I have realized this after so many marathons that we can’t bank time for the latter part by running fast in the beginning. It will almost always have a negative impact on the finish time. It is hard but one has to control the pace during the initial part of the marathon to ensure that we perform well at the latter stage. It helps to do training runs at a progressive speed so one gets used to it. If we start slow and finish fast during the training runs, it helps us train mentally for the race.

Mental fatigue:

Our brain is there to protect us from harm and can trick our body into feeling tired even when we have enough energy to go on. Our brain is a big consumer of glycogen and also needs to be supplied with energy. A sports drink is the savior in this case too. Also, there are various mental strategies runners use to distract themselves during the race and it would be good to practice a few of those during long training runs. Reminding oneself to stay in the present and repeating positive statements is extremely helpful and can help one push through the wall. Positive dialogue, when practiced regularly, becomes a habit and can help us during the race. Mentally breaking down the race in smaller parts and dealing with them separately also helps in managing the distance without feeling overwhelmed.

Hitting the wall is not the end of the race and we can push through it with some simple strategies. Firstly, consume simple sugars regularly during the race to ensure we have enough energy to sustain the pace we want to maintain. Second, maintain a steady pace as starting out too fast will burn up all the glycogen stores very quickly leaving us feeling drained of energy. The third and most important part is to stay positive and have a never give up attitude because it will help us through the ups and downs of the race and keep us motivated.

Always remember:

  • Carb load before a race.
  • Stay hydrated.
  • Stay positive.
  • Start slowly during the race.
  • Remember to consume enough simple carbs during the run.
  • Listen to your body.

GUEST COLUMNIST

 

Shailja is a mother of 2 kids and a part time model for a sustainable brand close to her heart called www.kinche.com. She’s either running after the kids or running to stay sane..

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Motivation Comments (0) |

Running and your respiratory health

 Can you run if you have breathing problems asks Radhika Meghanathan. 
Here’s the truth – you can develop breathing problem at any age, even if you are a seasoned runner. When you run, your muscles need more oxygen than usual, and thus your respiratory system needs to work quickly and more efficiently to deliver this oxygen. If there’s any problem in the airways or the lungs, this delivery will not happen seamlessly and that’s when you find it difficult to breathe. The reasons such problems may be caused, are as follows, from the least serious to most:
  1. Seasonal allergies:

A common symptom of an allergy is the closing up of airways and breathing problems. This is a relatively minor block, since all you need to do is to take care of your allergies. “For those who are allergic to dust or pollen, the solution is very easy. Avoid running outdoors in spring or dusty paths; instead, choose a clean, preferably air-conditioned environment,” advices Dr Thilagavathy, consultant pulmonologist and somnologist at Vijaya Hospital, Chennai.

  1. Exercise-induced breathing issues:

Do you struggle to breathe while you are exercising, but feel fine during other times? In this case, you may have breathing related issues. Unfortunately, there is no instant cure for this, since the causes of this can be three-fold:

  • Being overweight: When you carry extra kilos, it not only puts pressure on your knees and limbs but also on your heart and lungs. The obvious solution to this is to consult your GP and a good nutritionist, to adapt a healthy and sustainable diet that will encourage weight loss. Once your body loses some of its excess fat, you will it easier to run without any breathing issues.
  • Exercise induced Asthma: If you experience shortness of breath and wheezing only while running, then you me suffering from exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. Symptoms may also include coughing, fatigue and chest pain. “If you have this condition, it’s not advisable to run,” says Dr Thilagavathy. But those who have normal asthma need not despair. American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine has published a study that revealed that asthma sufferers can vastly improve their respiratory health by doing 30 minutes of aerobic activity like running, at least thrice a week.
  • Having cardiovascular issues: If you do not have enough oxygen in your blood due to heart disease, there is a high chance that you will experience breathing issues. If it persists, you may have to temporarily halt running and consult your doctor, who may recommend you for pulmonary rehabilitation, which will help you to exercise with less shortness of breath.

    3. Lung Disorders:

What if you are an avid runner but develop some lung or heart issues? “Even if you suffer from chronic lung disorders, if you take the right medication and have it under control, you can even compete at the Olympics!” assures Dr Thilagavathy. “The key is to have a regular exercise schedule. Running will strengthen the breathing muscles if the runner selects the right amount and intensity of the sport. People with lung disease should exercise as much as they can, as long as they clear their fitness routine with their primary care physicians.”

If you want to take care of your lungs, Dr Thilagavathy advises some form of pulmonary care on a regular base. “Do not be scared by the term ‘Pulmonary rehabilitation’, even pranayama comes under it. Anybody can benefit from pulmonary exercises; your physiotherapist can give you the best tips on how to improve your lung capacity, whether you are a runner or not,” she says.

 

 ABOUT THE AUTHOR

 

Radhika Meganathan is a published author who is an advocate for healthy living, she practices sugar-free intermittent fasting, all-terrain rambling and weight training.

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Events Comments (0) |

The Comrades of 2018

He just concluded Comrades Marathon had a lot of surprises this year, writes Nandini Reddy

The 89km Comrades Marathon is the world’s largest and oldest ultra marathon race. The event sees 20,000 runners from 60 countries competing to win the coveted race. The allowed time to finish the race is 11-12 hours and every year at least half the number or more tend to finish the race in the allotted time. Runners who apply for this race have to finish a full marathon within 5 hours to qualify. The race was run for the first time in May 1921. This year’s race’s official distance is 90.18 kms.

This is also an inclusive sport that sees many specially-abled athletes compete. This year, we saw amputee runner Xolani Luvuno pursuing his dream of competing in the Comrades with the help of crutches.  He was given 5 hours extra to complete the course.

The Comrades Marathon of 2018 saw the South African’s dominating the leader boards. Comrade marathon saw South African’s finishing in the top positions with timings of 5:26:34 hours by Bongmusa Mthembu in the first spot in the men’s category and Ann Asworth (6:10:44mins) in the women’s category. Mthembu won his 3rd race this day. Ashworth reclaimed the crown for South Africa this year.

What it takes to cross the finish line?

This world race has a lot of preparation behind the marvelous feats of the runners. It firstly required a lot of stamina to cross the finish line and can be daunting as the hours progress.

  1. Apply Vaseline all over your body to prevent chaffing
  2. Nutrition en-route is important so carry your own supplies
  3. Ensure your shoes are comfortable to prevent toe injuries
  4. Right clothes to prevent rubbing and rashes
  5. Take a bathroom break at regular intervals

Unscrupulous athletes are present in every marathon but if you decide to run the wrong way then you are likely to be served a ban.Entering the race with unverified qualifying times and lying about the qualifying times is the definite way to get yourself banned for life. Improving your seeding through false timings won’t get you very far but every year the Comrade organisers face these situations.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

 

An irregular runner who has run in dry, wet, high altitude and humid conditions. Loves to write a little more than run so now is the managing editor of Finisher Magazine.

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Training Comments (0) |

Frustrating Heel Pain

Achilles tendon is the most used when you run, so injury to that can be heartbreaking, writes Deepthi Velkur.

Sports injuries both acute and chronic can be very debilitating in nature and the recovery time is prolonged and frustrating. Injuries can lead to weakness in a particular area and may increase the chance of re-injury if neglected.

Some of the most common injuries suffered by sportspersons need professional attention and proper diagnosis under their guidance can lead to quick recovery causing no side effects. Achilles tendonitis is one of the most common athletic injuries. Any person who runs or participates in a sport that involves running risks experiencing Achilles tendonitis. Most injuries caused to the tendon are a result of gradual wear and tear to the tendon from overuse or aging.

Understanding ‘Achilles Tendonitis’

The Achilles tendon is a band of tissue that connects the calf muscles to the back of your foot and is considered to be the strongest tendon in your body. When you run, there are a lot of forces working on your Achilles tendon that cause microtraumas that are usually repaired by the body while resting. When there is lack of proper rest between training sessions, these traumas don’t fully recover causing an inflammation to occur. Joe Uhan, a physical therapist, coach and ultrarunner quotes “ Achilles Tendonitis is an acute inflammation of the tendon that runs along the back of the ankle”. He also adds by saying” Achilles tendinitis can be confused with other injuries, such as heel problems, but the hallmark sign is “if you’re pinching the Achilles and it’s really sore,”. If one experiences symptoms such as severe pain, swelling, tightness, redness or increased temperature, checking with a sports doctor or physiotherapist is recommended.

Potential Causes

  • Over-training
  • Change in training surface
  • Flat feet
  • Tight hamstring and calf muscles – could be a lack of proper warm-up or cooling down stretches
  • Constant use of high heels
  • Poor footwear
  • Hill running

Some recommended treatment options

  • Adequate rest for the damaged tendon is important.
  • Orthotics is a simple yet effective treatment is to wear heal pads which reduces the tension on the tendon.
  • Ice helps in reducing the pain and inflammation.
  • Professional physiotherapy will provide for deep transverse frictions as part of the exercise routine. A massage as well as ultrasound treatment will help improve blood flow to the area and realign the damaged fibers to promote healing.
  • Low impact exercises activities like swimming and cycling exert less strain on the Achilles tendon than running and jumping.
  • Stretching is a must in treating the Achilles tendon. When the calf muscles are stiff, stretches help in reducing the tension on the tendon. Stretching to be avoided when the resisted plantarflexion (e.g. rising up onto your tiptoes) is pain-free else it can lead to further damage.
  • Strengthening Exercises – Strengthening of calf muscles helps reduce the strain on the tendon. Simple exercises like keeping one knee straight, lean forward against the wall and place heel on the ground. The second exercise would be to bend the knee, place the other leg in front and push your hips toward the wall in order to stretch the calf muscles and the heel cord. Hold the position for 10 seconds, relax and repeat the exercise for 20 times for each foot.
  • Eccentric Exercises – This involves working the muscles by increasing tensile strength and the length of the tendon, and causing hypertrophy where the tissues increase in volume thereby helping in relaxation and lengthening of the tendon.

Process of Recovery

Recovery is usually slow as the supply of blood to the tendon is poor, reducing the oxygen circulation and nutrients required for the healing process. It takes between three and six months of consistent Achilles tendonitis treatment to recover completely. A good amount of rest from aggravating activities will allow the tendon to heal faster. It is advised by leading physiotherapists to start treatment of Achilles tendonitis early to avoid aggravating the injury.

 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

 

Deepthi Velkur is a former sprinter who is trying her hand at various sports today. A tennis fanatic, who believes that sleep should never be compromised.

 

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