Gear Comments Off on Tension free with TriggerPoint Foam Roller |

Tension free with TriggerPoint Foam Roller

The TriggerPoint GRID X Foam Roller is the best in the market if you are looking for something to aid your running recovery, writes Nandini Reddy.

Mobility is one of the most important components of fitness and recovery for runners needs the extra assistance and foam rollers are the go to product. TriggerPoint’s new Grid X upgrade for it foam roller is a hollow core foam roller that definitely gets the job done. The high quality of the GRID has helped make it a #1 tool of physical therapists, massage therapists, athletic trainers and professional athletes. The GRID is meant to be used for rolling your tight muscles, knots & kinks to eliminate / reduce soreness and increase range of motion by achieving greater mobility.

The Grid X Roller

The new version of the roller delivers a basic design which is hollow inside and bumpy outside. The new roller is an upgrade from the original roller as its twice as firm and defined for athletes who want to target dense muscle tissues.

The GRID roller has 3 different surfaces for you to utilize:

  1. The Flat Surface – Simulating the palms of the hands of a massage therapist.
  2. The Long Tubular Surface – For a deep tissue massage.
  3. The Small And Firm Surface – This is the surface that is the most aggressive and reaches the deepest into your tissue.

The TriggerPoint roller is known for its durability due to its rigid core.

  • This roller rolls better without slipping from underneath you
  • It is compact and travel-friendly
  • It is sturdy
  • Its design allows a finger-like feel
  • Perfect for deep tissue relief

The GRID comes in a variety of models – which vary in size – and also comes in a number of different colors. The way to differentiate between different firmnesses with GRID rollers is to look at the color of the inner core. GRID rollers with black cores are the standard, moderate firmness. The GRID X is extra-firm, and features a red core.

Sizes 

The products are available in three different sizes and two densities. Regular density models include:

  1. The original 13-inch GRID
  2. The 26-inch GRID 2.0
  3. And the 4-inch travel-friendly GRID Mini.
  4. The 13-inch GRID X features extra dense foam for working the tightest muscles.

Price

Its priced at Rs 2516.40 after a 20% price drop on Amazon.in. Its higher priced than the other rollers in the market.

Its constructed to be tough and sturdy. It is also the perfect roller for deep tissue muscle relief.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

 

An irregular runner who has run in dry, wet, high altitude and humid conditions. Loves to write a little more than run so now is the managing editor of Finisher Magazine.

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Training Comments Off on How to fix Heel Pain? |

How to fix Heel Pain?

If you have stepped out of bed and experienced a sharp pain in your heels, then you need to learn these remedies, writes Nandini Reddy.

Painful soles and a feeling like a million needles are pricking your heels is the hallmark symptom of heel pain. This is also the first symptom that tells you that the connective tissue in your sole is strained and inflammed and you could be seeing an onset of plantar fasciitis.

Once you experience this heel pain, the recovery period is long and slow. If you are in pain already or if you wish to avoid the injury then there are few cautionary tips for you to follow:

Re-think you training program

If you are experiencing heel pain then you need to inform your running coach or work with a physiotherapist who can alter your program. You will need to make changes in your speed, distance, gear and running terrains. Hilly and uneven terrain should be completely avoided as long as you have the heel pain. Work on getting different footwear that will support your foot.

Balance Rest and Stress

Opt for a running shoe that is a better fit. You will need to find a shoe with better arch support and cushioning on the heel. This will be less stressful on your foot. Get used to the new shoes by walking in them first. Strengthen and repair your damaged tissue and the surrounding muscles that offer support to the foot. Calf strengthening exercises are extremely important and your core stability is also paramount.

Relieve your Symptoms

Use a foot roller or a tennis ball and move your foot over it to relieve the muscle pain. You can also use a frozen water bottle to relieve the pain. These are for temporary relief of symptoms only. There are massage therapies available to manage the pain as well. These may not resolve the problem but are useful for temporary relief.

Don’t stop moving

Resting and not moving will not improve your problem. Aerobic exercise is the best way to take care of an inflammation. If you find it difficult to run then opt for an elliptical machine or running in a swimming pool. Essentially opt for a low-impact exercise that doesn’t put pressure on your foot.

Suggested Exercises

Calf raises are the best exercise to do to repair your heels. This exercise improves tissue quality and stretches out the stressed tissue bringing relief. This also works on the surrounding muscles and strengthens them as well. This can be done several times through the day.

The most important thing to remember is that recovering from heel pain needs patience.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

 

An irregular runner who has run in dry, wet, high altitude and humid conditions. Loves to write a little more than run so now is the managing editor of Finisher Magazine.

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Training Comments Off on The First 2 hours after a Marathon |

The First 2 hours after a Marathon

What to do and not to do right after finishing a marathon, writes Nandini Reddy.

Celebrate because you just finished a marathon, one of the best endurance challenges. Once you cross the finish line there are a few essential things you need to do in order to ensure that you do not hate yourself for running the marathon. It is best to have a game plan for recovery ready so that you are not regretting running the race tomorrow.

Don’t collapse to the floor

It might seem like an appealing idea to just drop to ground once you are across the finish line because legs must already be feeling like lead. But if you do not do that you will be doing yourself an enormous favour. When you just sit down or lie down once the race finishes you risk stiffening or pulling your muscle. As tempting as it might be, try and resist the urge until you have finished stretching. The best way to recover is slowly waking around the finisher’s holding area as it helps clear the excessive lactic acid that has build up in your muscles during the race.

Also since your body was working in the maximum heart rate zone, its never a good idea to abruptly stop because this will cause blood pooling in your legs and your blood pressure is also likely to drop. You will most likely feel dizzy or light-headed.

Drink, Drink, Drink – only Water

The moment you finish the race, your top priority should be to re-hydrate yourself. You can use running salts tablets also an active way to recover along with water. The amount of fluid you need depends on the length of the race, the weather conditions and how much fluid you drank during the race. If you want to know if you are hydrated well then just go for the old urine colour test. If your urine is dark yellow then you are dehydrated.

Stretch it out

Do static stretches that focus on your quads, hamstrings and calf muscles. Hold the stretches for 6 long inhales and exhales. These stretches will promote better blood flow and help recover your muscles quickly. You are less likely to experience DOMS (delayed onset muscle soreness) if you stretch well.

Get rid of the sweaty clothes

Your clothes will be soaked in sweat post the race. If you have someone meeting you at the finish line, ask them to carry a t-shirt for you. The cold sweat evapourating off your body might reduce your body temperature quickly and cause you to catch chill. Apart from that you might not make for great company in your sweaty clothes.

Use compression socks

Compression socks might look dorky but they are great for preventing blood pooling in your legs. Wear the socks up to the knees and you can keep them on for the rest of the day. Take them off while going to bed at night.  They are great to prevent swelling and reduce lactic acid built-up.

Don’t load the fats

While you run your stomach is the last place that gets blood supply as its not working at the time, so avoid fatty food that needs more effort to digest right after the race. The key for recovery is to get carbs into your body within 60 mins of finishing the race. You can try liquid carbs like a chocolate milkshake or a fruit juice instead of trying to chow down a sandwich. Also within two hours of finishing the race you need to have protein. It may be in the form of a whey protein drink instead of a steak.

Ice Bath

Once you are back home, give yourself a cold or ice water bath depending on the weather you were running in. You can add epsom salts and soak you feet to relieve the stress. This will help relax your muscles and prevent any further damage.

Listen to your body over the next few days and do not stress or strain it. Take light walks to ensure that you keep moving and don’t dedicate yourself to the couch but high intensity exercises can be avoided.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

 

An irregular runner who has run in dry, wet, high altitude and humid conditions. Loves to write a little more than run so now is the managing editor of Finisher Magazine.

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Nutrition Comments Off on Recovery Foods for Cyclists |

Recovery Foods for Cyclists

An essential part of your post cycling recovery is eating the right food, so what can you eat asks Nandini Reddy

Glycogen are the stores of energy you burn at the end of your long ride. So the most important recovery is to replenish these glycogen stores. Water, carbohydrates and proteins become the most essential foods to include in your recovery phase. The one thing to remember is that recovery food is not everyday food, these are the foods at give you instant energy and a punch to your flagging system.

The recovery food that you eat has a purpose, you should understand that it is needed for

  • Repairing the muscles with protein
  • Replenish energy stores with carbs
  • Getting your carb:protein ratio spot-on

A few suggestions on how you can recover quickly after a tiring ride beside a long nap include:

  • Chocolate Milkshake – This is the most optimal food and this is about the only time you can have it without guilt. A chocolate milkshake has a carb to protein ration of 4:1 and can immediately replace the used up glycogen aside from hydrating you as well. The immediate energy and endorphin boost from chocolate is also useful. When someone tells you to drink a chocolate milkshake, don’t ask too many questions!
  • Rice – Please indulge in the most simple carbs like rice. Its easy to digest and provides the right kind of energy. The high Glycemic Index of rice makes it the perfect recovery food. Include dal as an accompaniment with the rice to ensure you get the best combination of protein and carbs.
  • Eggs – Eggs provide significant protein and you can even carry boiled eggs with the shell with you during your ride and have it immediately after the ride as a quick recovery food. It is a favoured food for trekkers and other endurance athletes alike.
  • Root Vegetables – All root vegetables are great for carbohydrate loading. You can have it as a dry roasted snack or as a curry with rice. These vegetables are also rich in fibre, beta-carotene, vitamin C, manganese and potassium.
  • Nuts & Nut Butters – Nuts, dry fruits and nut butters are ideal for a post-ride snack. They are high in fats and protein and can help recover the glycogen levels quickly.
  • Whey Fruit Smoothie – Whey is a great recovery food and is a go to food for many cyclists. You can improve the nutritive value of whey by making a smoothie using fruits.

Never scrimp on post recovery calories because you are trying to lose weight. Training days need higher than normal carbs in order to fuel your body to complete the endurance task. You can avoid unnecessary snacking and stick to fresh foods for recovery.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

 

An irregular runner who has run in dry, wet, high altitude and humid conditions. Loves to write a little more than run so now is the managing editor of Finisher Magazine.

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Training Comments Off on Recovery for Senior Runners |

Recovery for Senior Runners

Senior runners often battle fatigue more often than their younger counterparts, so what kind of recovery can help, asks Nandini Reddy.

For any runner if the body is allowed ample rest and nutrition then it recovers more effectively. Older runners will experience greater damage to their muscles when they have finished a half or full marathon. The extended recovery time should be accounted for in the training itself.

The Rest Period

The rule of thumb for senior runners is 1 week of recovery for every 10k run. For a full marathon it is important to get a full 4 weeks of recovery with little or no strain on the body. The light recovery exercises can include stretches, body weight training and walking. If you have run a full or half marathon, try not to do any sort of exercise for the first week. After that you can start working on light exercises that utilize your body weight and are low intensity. After the recovery period is finished you can also consider adding weight training to ensure that your muscles are strengthened.

The Nutrition Factor

There can be no recovery without nutrition. In the early recovery phase, pay more attention to carbohydrates and proteins. These will help you recover faster as the glycogen is required for your muscles to rebuild and repair damage.

Sleep Factor

Sleep is an important recovery component and getting at least 6 hours of sleep is mandatory if you are in the recovery period. Your muscles have the maximum recovery while you sleep and your body recovery tends to slow down if you do not sleep well. So remember getting that shut eye might just be the one factor that you are missing in your recovery routine.

Use a Coach

Sometimes our ambition might get ahead of us so it is important to have a coach who can monitor progress and give suggestions of exercises and running schedules that are suitable for your age and body condition. Even if you have run world famous marathons, the idea is to re-adapt your training to your current body and age. So its important to have a coach or at least be part of group so that you get tips on recovery and training runs.

While these are broad guidelines to recovery for senior runners, you need to remember that you should always listen to your body. If you need more time than your running partner then take it. There is no wisdom in causing further damage because of inadequate recovery.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

 

An irregular runner who has run in dry, wet, high altitude and humid conditions. Loves to write a little more than run so now is the managing editor of Finisher Magazine.

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Training, Uncategorized Comments Off on Take a Hiatus from Running |

Take a Hiatus from Running

Taking a hiatus from running can seem tough but it might be the best thing you can do for yourself, writes Nandini Reddy. 

Runners tend to get consumed by their passion. The frustration from not reaching peak performance can cause a runner to train in an extreme manner that might lead to injury. Instead if you ever feel that you are slipping then it might make more sense to take a break from running. While this suggestion might sound counter-intuitive to a runner in training, it is probably the best thing you can do for yourself.

Here are a few reasons why you should consider taking a break from running.

When should you take a break? – Once racing season is done, plan at least a 4 week break. Your body needs to rest from the constant pounding it has received during the marathons. Also there is less guilt about missing a big race. Pick you racing season for the year and once it wraps up, ensure that you put away your running shoes. It is also a good idea to take a break when running becomes too monotonous for you. Running without enthusiasm won’t lift your spirits and the break will do more good for your mood than running would at that time.

How long should your hiatus last? – Remember that muscles tend to recover during the break period. You can stay fit by doing other activities like strength training and yoga which are beneficial to build muscle strength. Ensure you take a minimum of 4 weeks off. You can extend this to more if required but don’t reduce the amount to lesser than 3 weeks if you want to enjoy the full benefits of recovery.

Most runners feel that a break from training means they will run lesser miles or that it will affect their pace. But in reality a run after a period of recovery is stronger than one where there is no proper recovery for the body. A few of the benefits of taking a hiatus include:

  1. Injuries can be dealt with and given the right amount of rest and treatment
  2. It can cure a runners burnout
  3. Mentally you will be recharged and more excited to run again
  4. It will help you refocus your goals.
  5. Work out a training plan based on experience and with a clear mind

Once you are back in training, don’t stress on pace and mileage immediately. Build up to it and you will notice that you can reach your goals faster and with less fatigue.

By no means am I suggesting that taking a break would be a joyful experience for a runner, but if you want to keep running strong for many years then it is inevitable. When you take a break you come back with a stronger performance, a more fit body and higher enthusiasm.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

 

An irregular runner who has run in dry, wet, high altitude and humid conditions. Loves to write a little more than run so now is the managing editor of Finisher Magazine.

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Training Comments Off on Recovery after a Marathon |

Recovery after a Marathon

If you have just finished a marathon this weekend then you should be focusing on how to recover your body before embarking on your next training session, writes Nandini Reddy.

Soreness after running any marathon is unavoidable  and it can last from one to three days and sometimes even a week depending on how experienced a marathoner you are. There are several steps that you can take to ease your discomfort and head to a faster recovery.

Move Around

As opposed to the popular belief that you need to stretch to relive your muscles after a marathon, most coaches advice that you move around at a slow pace. This sort of movement prevents injury and also relieves swelling of any kind. It is a form of active recovery and is considered to be more beneficial

Elevate your legs

Try and keep you legs elevated to avoid blood pooling. The simplest way is to prop up a few pillows below your feet. If not you can also lie at a 90 degree angle against the wall with your legs propped up. This is a position that even elite marathoners swear by. This should be repeated for the whole week after the race for about 10 – 15 minutes a day.

Cold shower or ice bath

If you are up for it an ice bath or a cold shower will certainly help relieve niggling muscle aches. It is a bit tough to do but it prevents blood pooling in the legs and also relieves sore muscles. This is purely based on the fact that you can withstand something that cold.

Stay off the booze

One celebratory drink is alright but too much alcohol into a body that is already recovering is not a good idea. At least for a week after your marathon try and ease off on the drinking so that your body can recover faster.

Massage and stretches

Get a massage or do your stretches preferably from the day after or even later if you have severe soreness. Don’t rush into stretching your muscles because you might end up causing injuries.

Give it time

Running a marathon is a highly stressful event for your body. Give it the time it needs to recover and consult with your coach before you start training again. Mentally you might feel ready but you need to respect your body and give it the time it needs to recover.

Cross Train

A week after your marathon try and cross train using low impact exercises so that your muscles can heal better and run short distances for about 30 minutes to test the waters. You can always get back to full fledged training once you are completely recovered.

Racing season means running multiple races and that means recovery should be as good as well. Let your body lead you instead of your ambition.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

 

An irregular runner who has run in dry, wet, high altitude and humid conditions. Loves to write a little more than run so now is the managing editor of Finisher Magazine.

Read more