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When Does Running get Easier?

Running is an easy sport to get into but is incredibly demanding, so when will you fall in love with running, asks Nandini Reddy

Running is a rewarding cardiovascular activity that is easy to take up. That is a the reason that so many people give running a shot at least once in their lives. There are marathons scheduled, practically every weekend and each of them sees nearly 50% of new runners registering just so that they can also experience what their runner friends have been talking about. But many beginners become disenchanted very quickly because they feel running is a lot harder to do than they anticipated. We need to remember that like all physical activity, running is demanding and requires consistency. You are more likely to feel miserable in the first few weeks of running than experiencing running highs. What new runners also need to consider is that running highs do not happen all the time even for experienced runners, even they are likely to feel miserable after a run.

So how long does it really take before you feel good about running?

Each runner is unique and when running starts to feel good for you depends on the point your started. Here are a few question you need to answer first

  • Are you overweight and did you start running to lose weight?
  • How fit were you when you started running?
  • Did you have your doctor’s approval before you started running?
  • At what age did you start running?
  • How consistent have you been while running?

A relatively active person should be able to adapt to the rigor of running fairly quickly. A sedentary runner shouldn’t expect to become Mo Farah after 10 runs. If you are in your 20s or 30s and at a healthy weight then within 3 weeks you will find your running high based on the fact that you are consistent. If you are starting after your 40s you will take longer to adapt and you need more time to orient your body to the stress of running. Overweight runners will also need more time because there is more to lift and each strike puts more pressure on your knees and ankles.

So if you want to stick to running and get good at it, then you need to follow a few rules,

Be Realistic – Remember that you are starting a high impact exercise and your body needs time to adapt. As you train it will get easier. You also need time to run faster and cover more distance so give yourself the time you need to increase your strength and stamina.

Start Slow – Try and get a coach to give you a training plan. Digital coaches will also work, so you can start by following app based training programs. Try and include cross training into your routine so that your muscles will be better prepared to handle the strain of running. Try interval training methods like a run-walk routine to begin with.

Always Warm-up – Never run cold. You should always warm up before you start you run. This helps prevent injury and will also make it easier to run. Once your heart rate is elevated and your muscles are warmed up, you will feel more comfortable during your run.

Remember to Cool Down – Make it a habit to cool down. Stretch or walk to ensure that you muscles relax and the lactic acid that has built up, dissipates. It is also good for recovery and new runners should make it a habit to cool down irrespective of the the distance they have run.

Find an experienced partner – Tagging along with an experienced runner with give you motivation and incentive to stick to your training programme. You may not run as fast or as long as they can but you will get some very useful tips on pacing that will help you run more comfortably.

The idea is to be consistent and motivate to stick it out for the first few weeks that it takes to cross the threshold to become comfortable as a runner.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

 

An irregular runner who has run in dry, wet, high altitude and humid conditions. Loves to write a little more than run so now is the managing editor of Finisher Magazine.

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