Motivation Comments (0) |

Strapped for time? Run at night!

If only I had the time to run, seems to be the lament for a lot of us who struggle to fit in running during the day. Well, how about after the day, asks Radhika Meganathan.

Have you ever considered running after the sun had set, with the stars above you keeping company? Poetic, but not practical, you say? Come on! Consider the pros:

  1. Better chance at forming good habits. It’s so easy to hit the couch in the evening, switch on the TV and all good intentions go out of the window. When you opt for a night run, you then automatically fight against lethargy and be proactive, by choosing to run either straight from your work or once you arrive home, before or after dinner.
  2. Better life co-ordination. For some of us, running in the morning is just not done. You might be a night owl, wake up a tad too late and greet a scorching sun. You might have an early shift, by way of work or other life commitments like an early school run. And let’s not forget certain issues of intimacy. “My husband doesn’t run, and we both work, so I really do not want to miss the early morning cuddle time with him,” confesses Sheila*, an ardent runner. Universal Solution? Night runs.
  3. Better mind space. Each day brings new goals and routine obligations, and it can get quite overwhelming when you try to accommodate your passion for running in the early morning chaos (or midday work blues). Naturally, when you choose night runs, the ever-busy day is over and you are free to breathe easy and truly savour your running time. “I always get my run done however late I get back from work. I prepare dinner for kids and go for a run at 8:30pm or even later,” says Srimathy Vardan, investment banker in New York.
  4. Better sleep. Modern day stress, overuse of gadget and bad work-life management have lead to poor sleeping patterns, and seemingly a whopping 50% of people complain of poor sleep in the night. The problem is, if you don’t sleep well, then you don’t perform well the next day. With a night run, your body is pleasantly tired and ready to welcome some deep sleep – an easy, natural and healthy remedy for a complex health issue, a free one at that.

Now that we have convinced you that running is the night is the next best thing, here are some pointers to keep in mind while you burn the not-quite-midnight oil to run:

  • Always keep your phone with you, fully charged and with the latest tracking apps. Investing in a head lamp and clothing with reflective strips or piping is a great idea.
  • Never run in unknown roads; keep to well-lit, well known roads and paths, even if you live in a safe neighbourhood.
  • If you need music while running, opt for a audio book or podcast, since you will still be able to hear outside sounds over your headphones.
  • Do not eat too rich or too much food before your night run. Eat at least two hours before the run, to avoid gastrointestinal issues.
  • If you can postpone dinner until after your run, you will be able to burn some good calories! But if you have type diabetes, you should run after dinner, as studies have shown that it can help lower the risk of cardiovascular disease.
  • If you do have dinner two hours before a run, then chances are you may wake up at 3am with a roaring hunger. To prevent this, always have a banana or a protein shake as a post-run, pre-sleep snack before going to bed. Good night and good running!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

 

Radhika Meganathan is a published author who is an advocate for healthy living, she practices sugar-free intermittent fasting, all-terrain rambling and weight training.

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Gear Comments (0) |

Do you have the right running gear?

Choosing the right running gear can improve your comfort, performance and keep you injury free, writes Nandini Reddy.

The right running gear can be the determining point between a comfortable run or a run fraught with discomfort. If you are a new runner then it is best to visit a specialist store to ensure that you get the right kind of gear. Even if you are not a serious runner investing into good gear will always make running a pleasurable experience. R

Technical Clothing

If you are running in humid weather then you need to dri-fit clothes. In cold weather ensure your wear thicker clothing or cold resistant clothing. These fabrics know how to handle sweat and adjust your body temperature. If you practice layering you can also adapt to the weather by adding or removing items of clothing.

Sunglasses

When you are running in summer or running a long trail run ensure you carry a pair of sunglasses that are light. You get frame-less options that are made for running. These prevent your eyes from getting tired and also prevent dust from irritating your eyes while you run.

Socks

Socks are very important for runners. The right socks can ensure that you have a comfortable run. Compression socks are worn by a few runners while running to enhance blood flow. You can check with your trainer before using them. Invest into a few pairs of athletic socks. Remember to buy your socks and shoes together so that you know how comfortable you are using them in combination.

Drink Belt

This belt should be multi-purpose. It should hold your bottle, keys and phone. Most of us need to carry all these items when we run so its impractical to invest into two different items for them. You will get good quality belts that can hold all these items. You can also ask experienced runners for recommendations.

Sports Bra

Choose a sports bra that has adjustable straps and can wick moisture. No female runner should run without a comfortable and supportive sports bra. You can get more recommendations based on your type of activity from www.lessbounce.com

Water Bottle

Invest into a light weight sipper style bottle. It should hold at least 500ml of water. You don’t need a bigger bottle during your training and during a race you are likely to come across water stations. Ensure that you bottle fits securely in the belt and doesn’t disturb your running flow.

Right Shoes

If you want to learn how to pick the right shoes then read our article Pick the Right Kicks

GPS Watch

Ensure you get a GPS watch with a Heart Rate Monitor so that you can check if you are working in the right heart rate zone. These watches will also help you monitor pace, distance and timing and track your progress.

Read Potential of the Running Watch to know how best you can use your running watch.

 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

 

An irregular runner who has run in dry, wet, high altitude and humid conditions. Loves to write a little more than run so now is the managing editor of Finisher Magazine.

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Featured Comments (0) |

Going the distance with Sagar Baheti

A visual impairment hasn’t slowed down Sagar Baheti’s ambitions to complete the toughest marathon course, writes Deepthi Velkur.

The things we are able to accomplish with a little mind-over-matter is astonishing. Case in point: Sagar Baheti. A 31-year old Bengalurean who runs a successful import and export stone business and in 2017 was the first ever visually impaired runner from India to successfully complete the Boston marathon. In a chat with Sagar recently, I was fascinated by his tale of perseverance, hard work and fortitude. This is what he had to say:

You’ve always been a sporting enthusiast, especially cricket – what brought about the switch to running?

Truth be told, I took to running in 2013 purely because my options were fairly limited given my condition. Cricket has always fascinated me in my early days all the way through to zonal and university levels. After issues with my vision which surfaced 5 years ago, I took up running and as they say, the rest is history.

With the company of a few good friends, I did the midnight run in Bengaluru and that fueled my interest. My first serious run was the Coorg Escapade in 2013 for which I trained a fair bit and the sheer joy of participating in such a run was immense.

What do you find to be the most rewarding thing about running, especially long-distance running?

The feeling of accomplishment is what is most rewarding. When I signed up for the Coorg run (which is a beautiful trail run), it was meant to be a fun weekend activity because I had no idea if I was even capable of finishing it, but at the end of the 12K run, I felt amazing. In many ways the Coorg run was the catalyst for me getting into serious running – I have never looked back since.

You successfully completed the Boston marathon in 2017 – a watershed moment in Indian sport. Can you please describe your feeling at the finish line?

Relief and sense of achievement! There was a lot of build up to the run given that this is one of the most iconic races on the running calendar so as I got to the finish line, I felt a sense of pride in myself for completing the race. Little did I know that I was the first ever visually impaired runner from India to have completed the historic race covering the distance of 42 kms in a little over four hours – it made me glad that I was able to make a mark for myself

Out of curiosity – why the Boston marathon and not someplace else?

Well, after I started running seriously, I covered pretty much every run in India from Bangalore to Mumbai to Delhi and even Ladakh. During this time, I was chatting with a friend in Boston and she suggested I take part in the Boston marathon. Being such a popular race, I was definitely interested so I signed up, managed to qualify for the race and in 2017 successfully completed the run.

One of your goals post the Boston marathon was to raise $10,000 for MABVI – were you successful in raising that funding?

My friend and I have always been involved in fund-raising and she gave me this idea of raising funds for MABVI (Massachusetts Association for the Blind and Visually Impaired) an association based in Boston that she works with closely and I was more than happy to be part of the initiative.

The objective was to serve two purposes – raise funds and create awareness for MABVI. We started off a crowd-funding page highlighting the visually impairment condition and we successfully raised $7,600.

How did you prepare yourself physically and mentally for the Boston marathon? Is it a similar training program to your other runs?

The Boston marathon was bigger than anything I have done before so I really wanted to be well prepared. Overall, I stuck with my training routine that I followed for my runs in India but put more focus on mental strength as the pressure on this run was higher. The circuit itself is considered to be of medium-toughness given the gradient levels and course challenges, so my training program was slightly modified to suit this.

It must have been extremely tough for you and your parents when you were diagnosed with Stargardt’s disease – what drove you on to achieve what you have today? 

Yes it was a tough time – being diagnosed with such a condition really sets you back in your ways because it forces you to make lifestyle changes and increase your dependency on others. I consider myself very fortunate to have family and friends who were very supportive and have helped me along the way. This support is what has driven me to where I am today and helped me in setting goals that put me in the right path to achieve them.

Running a business is not a small task – how do you find the time to train and stay in shape?

The first year post my diagnosis was slow as I had to figure new ways of doing simple things such as reading and writing. With the love and support from family and friends plus using aids such as voice and magnifiers, I got through the tough phase and focused on getting physically active. This support has given me the time I need to train and stay in shape.

For your next run – where and when. Is that all planned out?

As is life, there is always a bit of drama! During a business trip in Spain last year, I went skydiving and ended up having a crash. I suffered a serious cervical spine injury that required emergency surgery and follow-up corrective surgery as well. What followed was a 4-month rehab program that slowly got me to my feet and back into running.

I did run the Mumbai marathon  in Jan 2018 to get my confidence back but my body wasn’t ready yet. During this time, I met a friend who trains with Bengaluru-based running club- Jayanagar Jaguars who encouraged me to join the group. At that point, I thought running as a group will give me more motivation than training alone. There, I met some good runners who understood my needs and now we run as a group. I am back into full-fledged training as I prepare for my next run – the 50k Malnad Ultra run on October 13th and 14th, 2018.
Apart from running, what other sporting activity has kept you busy?

I have always being a cycling enthusiast and though I cannot cycle long distances yet, I am hopeful  to do so once my shoulders and neck feel strong enough. One of my best cycling memories is the 2015 Tour of Nilgiris which is a 850km circuit spready across 7 days. I did the same tour the following year as well.

As with anything these days, I can’t help but think of what Sagar’s experience can teach us all. Very briefly, we will achieve only through practice and hard work.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

 

Deepthi Velkur is a former sprinter who is trying her hand at various sports today. A tennis fanatic, who believes that sleep should never be compromised.

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Training Comments (0) |

How many Kms should you run a week?

If you are training for a 10k, half marathon or full marathon, there is a minimum number of kms that you need to run every week, writes Nandini Reddy.

Preparing your body before the big race is important to ensure that you have the ability to endure the stress of the race. We always tend to run faster and harder on race day so how can we prepare ourselves to run by working up a good training plan. But many runners in training encounter harsh training plans that have unrealistic distances that they need to run.

But a standard training plan may not work for every one because each person’s strength and endurance level is different. One plan cannot fit everyone so it is important to assess yourself personally and see how you can train to achieve you goal while keeping your own strengths and limitations in mind.

How much should you run?

A standard understanding of training and kms per week for running various race distances is

  • 5k – New Runner (20-25 kms)/ Seasoned Runner (30-40kms)
  • 10k – New Runner (30-35 kms)/ Seasoned Runner (45-60kms)
  • 21k – New Runner (40-45 kms)/ Seasoned Runner (65-75kms)
  • 42k – New Runner (40-50kms)/ Seasoned Runner (80-90 kms)

A few training tips you can follow to determine the right running distance per week for you –

Run more if you are running longer  When you are training for a marathon your weekly training kms target should match the distance you intend to run. You need to achieve your weekly distance in three ways – long run days, fast run days and rest days. The ultimate goal to achieve the distance you intend to achieve in a week but most importantly you need to remember that the pace of your run should be slow to start with and should then progress to higher speeds. So mix up longer and shorter run to achieve the distance. If on any day you feel too tired then don’t push yourself and use that as rest and recovery day. But even if you feel well, it is important to have rest days to ensure that you are in peak health.

Higher goals means more running – Do you want to just finish the race or finish it in a particular time and at a particular pace? If you have higher goals than just finishing the race then you need to alter your weekly distance run to achieve them. You will need to worry about your endurance, sustainability and energy utilization when you want to achieve specific performance goals. The idea is to ensure that you body is able to sustain the elongated periods of running. So the longer your run, the stronger you will get to handle the longer running distances.

Pace is equally important – Running at the same pace all the time is not a good training plan. Interval training and tempo training are great ways to ensure that you experiment with different pace. The body’s running efficiency will improve during these training runs. This will make you a better runner and adapt your body to move comfortably at different paces. This will also help when you are trying to clear the last few miles and your body and muscles are already tired. You will know how to alter your pace to reduce the fatigue effect and complete the race in your goal performance parameters.

Take it slow when you run more – You may have started your first week in training with just 10kms. But as you get stronger your distances will increase. But that doesn’t mean that you run faster to gain distance. Each week you can aim to increase your distance by 10-15%. The body needs to adapt to these extra kms so it is important that you take it slow. Worry more about the quality of your run instead of just the quantity. Your body is under stress from the changes in distance and you need to be aware that you need to take it slow so that it can adapt.

Your body needs attention – Running comes with some discomfort and part of the challenge is to push your body to a new territory of fitness that it has not been in before. But remember that your body will tell you if something is not right. If you feel a sharp pain or a persistent pain then its time to stop and address it. Never run through these pains as it can lead to injury. Your body needs to heal so a rest day is equally important for your training plan. You need to give your body time to adapt to the new running regime and you can do it more efficiently if you pay more attention to the signs your body might be giving you.

Stay injury-free – In order to finish a race you need to be healthy and injury free. If you have over done your training and have ended up being injured, what’s the use of all the training. You need to be aware of your limits and learn to work to peak your performance without breaking your body. If you are running a longer race give priority to sustenance rather than speed. For shorter races you can focus on speed. But whichever way you go remember that you cannot injure yourself.

The real test of your training is on race day and you need to be at the starting line feeling strong and healthy to take on the challenge of the run ahead of you. If you are not training for a race them 10-15 kms are week is a perfect distance to just stay in shape.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

 

An irregular runner who has run in dry, wet, high altitude and humid conditions. Loves to write a little more than run so now is the managing editor of Finisher Magazine.

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Events Comments (0) |

Why run the Tata Mumbai Marathon?

Capt Seshadri explores why you should run the most prestigious marathon for Indian runners, the Tata Mumbai Marathon.

The seven islands of Mumbai, when seen as a whole, have a gap in between. Observe closely and you will see the gap as the profile of a runner. This has aptly been captured in the logo of the Tata Mumbai Marathon, an annual event which, like an irresistible magnet, draws 45,000 runners from all over India and from across continents. For those who have already participated, the itch to return is unavoidable; for those who haven’t, here is the bugle call.

On the third Sunday of January every year, the city wakes up to a riot of colours. Women and men, children and senior citizens, and even the disabled, leaning on crutches or being assisted in wheelchairs, all attired in colourful running gear, head to one destination – the Azad Maidan, and with one objective – to celebrate the freedom of running. The local trains and buses are filled with the excited chatter of groups of runners participating in different categories. The intrepid and the experienced will run the full 42 k in anything between 3 and 6 hours. Following them will be the half marathoners, the Open 10 k participants, dream runners covering 6.6 k, the senior citizens running over 4.7 k, and finally, the ‘champions with disabilities’ being cheered unceasingly over 2.1 km. Mumbai comes alive with its trademark spirit.

When it comes to the Tata Mumbai Marathon, or the TMM as it is popularly called, there is no reason to run; only an emotion to experience. Inspired by the London Marathon and with its first edition in 2004, it is today one of the world’s leading marathons, categorised as an IAAF Silver Label Road Race. On this day, elite Olympic and world class runners, business tycoons, celebrities and thousands of amateurs, rub sweaty shoulders to celebrate the spirit of freedom and to contribute to charity. The financial capital of the country opens its treasure chest with a huge heart. As India’s biggest charity platform, this event has, in 11 years, contributed an astounding USD 30 million and more.

This is the day to savour the sights of Mumbai on foot; something that can never be done from a motor vehicle in bustling traffic. The route rolls past the Chhatrapati Shivaji Terminus and the historic Flora Fountain, moves on to the Marine Drive, past Haji Ali and opens out on to the breathtaking view from the Bandra – Worli Sea Link. Crossing the halfway mark, the runners wind past Mahim Church, Jaslok Hospital, the Wankhede Stadium and almost up to Land’s End at Nariman Point. All along the route, cheering Mumbaikars, sacrificing their Sunday morning sleep, line up to encourage the runners, with bands playing popular tunes, folk dances and even an elderly Gujarati gentleman in a beret, playing on his harmonica. This is the true boost to the adrenaline, the real reason to run.

The TMM is probably one of the few marathons in the country that attracts runners and running clubs from every corner of the country. With participants from the deep south of Kerala and Tamil Nadu, from every metro and city in the country and even from far away Assam, it transcends the boundaries of mere running and morphs into a multi-cultural celebration of the spirit of participation.

Can you hear the bugle call?

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

 

Capt Seshadri Sreenivasan is a former armed forces officer with over 30 years experience in marketing. He also a consulting editor with a leading publishing house. He is a co-author of the best selling biography of astronaut Sunita Williams.

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Seniors Comments (0) |

The Man who ran Forever

Legendary Senior Runner, Ed Whitlock is remembered for his indomitable spirit by Capt Seshadri

It was a warm summer day in Toronto, on March 13, 2017. It was a day of mourning for the marathon runners of the world. The day marked the unfortunate demise, due to prostate cancer, of a master athlete, just a week past his 86th birthday, the only runner to complete a series of marathons at an age past 80, in less than 4 hours. RIP Ed Whitlock!

Born on March 6, 1931, this English-origin Canadian did not start running again until he was 41, concentrating at the time on middle-distance running, and after several years recording best times of 1:59.9 for the 800 metres and 4:02.5 for the 1500 metres. His initiation into marathon running came at age 48, from a spat with his 14-year old son, who Ed could not dissuade from competing but, rather, ran alongside and casually completed the course in 2:31:23. Now he was bitten by the running bug!

Well into his 60s, he turned his attention to road racing. However, it was as late as in 2003, when at age 72, he ran the 26.2 miler in 2:59:49. Two years later, the time was 2:58:40, creating the record for the oldest man to run a marathon in under 3 hours. The number crunchers confirm that, if extrapolated in age with a 20-year old runner, this time would have been equivalent to 2:03:57, probably one of the fastest marathons of all time!

Fifteen minutes at eighty years; that was the improvement Whitlock made to the world record for his age category, with an astonishing time of 3:25:43 at the April 2011 Rotterdam Marathon. Not satisfied with this superhuman effort, he improved the timing in October the same year, at the Toronto Waterfront Marathon, to 3:15:54. Nothing could stop this remarkable athlete, least of all age. In October 2016, all of 85 years old, he became the oldest marathoner to complete the course in less than 4 hours, with a run of 3:56:34, once again at Toronto.

Ed’s running career and training program are unusual and unorthodox. His running shoes are worn out and outdated. His running vest is probably a couple of decades and a half old. He has never consulted a coach or trainer and has no records of his training mileage. And, unimaginable to any hardcore runner, he had no masseur, did not do weight training or stretching and abhorred supplements of any kind. What probably worked in his favour is an extraordinary lung capacity and a lean mass. But, above all, a dedication to win against time, against the track and against the body clock. With a cemetery as a running ground, Ed trained all alone, running around it for over 3.5 hours at a time, day after day.

Aging is an argument among the medical fraternity when it comes to Ed Whitlock. His running records at such an advanced age have prompted scientists and geriatric specialists to take a relook at the processes of aging and athletic performance. However, Ed’s own philosophy is quite simple. “I believe people can do far more than they think they can. You have to be idiot enough to try it.”

In a fitting tribute to a senior runner, Ed Whitlock, the super marathoner with undying stamina and indomitable spirit, was inducted into the Milton Sports Hall of Fame in 2016.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

 

Capt Seshadri Sreenivasan is a former armed forces officer with over 30 years experience in marketing. He also a consulting editor with a leading publishing house. He is a co-author of the best selling biography of astronaut Sunita Williams.

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Motivation Comments (0) |

Run to de-stress

Did you know that running is the best way to de-stress, asks Deepthi Velkur.

Running has numerous health benefits both physically and psychologically. People who run regularly run tend to lead a healthier life and have a more positive outlook. Being non-sedentary and moving around in open spaces has a fabulous effect on the psyche. Most of us spend our days cooped up in offices with air-conditioning turned on all the time. Getting out in the open and going for a run is a great way to build up your resilience to mental- health issues, the most common being stress. As the author of ‘What I Talk About When I Talk About Running’, Haruki Murakami, says “Most runners run not because they want to live longer but because they want to live life to the fullest.”

Stress can be both acute and chronic in nature and can have negative effects on your body leading to heart disease, diabetes, arthritis, early aging and weakening of the immune system. So here are a few ways to use running as a great way to fight stress:

Pumps up your mood-Running boosts your mood in a big way. Running helps increase the productivity of a chemical in your body to quell pain called endorphins or runner’s high. They help to slow down the aging process, relieve stress and anxiety, and enhance the immune system in general.

Trains your mind– Running trains the mind as much as it trains the body. You learn to focus better and are determined to take on new challenges and overcome any obstacle. With the mental strength and willpower that running brings, it can change a person’s perspective on life, confidence, and clarity of thought.

Synchronizes your body – In order to relieve stress you need to synchronize your body, that means you breathing, heart rate and body reactions should all be in sync. Running is the easiest form of exercise that can bring your body into sync in the shortest time. A body in sync will get rid of stress quicker.

Fight or Flight – Stress activates your survival instinct and it can leave you feeling antsy. The best way to reduce this feeling is by going for a run. Even a jog will do the trick to relax your mind and reduce the stress inducing hormones.

Finding your Flow – Running gives your body a certain rhythmic flow. The repetitive action of pounding the road in measured strides sets a certain flow to your body. This helps in settling your mind and bringing you back to focus on the important and not the stressful activity.

Running Groups – Running in a group helps you interact with people who share the same philosophy of exercise. They also might be experiencing the same stress and can help you release your negativity and stress better. You will also feel less alone while trying to fight your daily battles.

You will be surprised about how much anxiety can be relieved by a comfortable 20 min run. If you don’t believe me, then why don’t you try it for yourself.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

 

Deepthi Velkur is a former sprinter who is trying her hand at various sports today. A tennis fanatic, who believes that sleep should never be compromised.

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Motivation Comments (0) |

Running on Vacation

Running is an active way to relax and recharge while on a vacation and with a little effort you can fit this into your vacation schedule, writes Deepthi Velkur

For most of us,  we remember a vacation by looking at pictures taken, stamped passports or even the odd souvenir that we bring back home. For a runner, however, it invokes memories of a dashing waterfall or maybe the lazy cows at sunrise or the serenity of a deserted beach.

Follow these five tips to run during a vacation and you are guaranteed to keep up with training and even get some insider tips from locals on where to eat, shop and play.

Start your day with a run – Getting your run done first thing in the morning of your vacation is a great way to start the day as it ensures you don’t push it out for later and also helps free up your day. Also, you will be less dodging to do as you avoid the crowds and you can check out the area much before the hoard of tourists arrives.

Research and map your running route – Do a little research on running routes close to your hotel as you will be able to map your run stress-free. Using technology can be a great way of identifying a few local favorites at your vacation spot. If you don’t find the time to do some research, just head out for a run and see where your feet take you. This forces you to pay attention to streets and landmarks and other intimate things that otherwise you might miss.

Packing Right – When packing for a vacation, drawing up a packing list will ensure that you don’t find yourself without your running must-haves. Ensure that you carry running gear that is suited for any weather type to help you avoid missing out on your run.

Stay Safe – This should be your primary objective – avoid narrow and busy roads, neighborhoods that appear unsafe and always carry your phone, money and the hotel business card just in case you do get lost. Also, checking in with the hotel concierge or some friendly locals is a good way to identify if your route is safe.

Let Loose and Explore – A key tip to running on your vacation is “forget about mileage”. The focus should not be on distance, pace and intensity; instead, focus on the sights, sounds and everything exciting the new environment has to offer.

There are heaps of benefits to run on a vacation but please ensure you follow the tips and add to your holiday experience.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

 

Deepthi Velkur is a former sprinter who is trying her hand at various sports today. A tennis fanatic, who believes that sleep should never be compromised.

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Gear Comments (0) |

Guide to picking a Running T-Shirt

The right T-shirt can be the difference between a comfortable run and an irritating one, writes Nandini Reddy

We have come a long way from cotton t-shirts and sweat shirts in terms of running wear. We have a host of options from long sleeves to no sleeves and from cotton to breathable fabric and to dry fits. Today there is specially designed apparel that is suitable for long distance running. Apparel that can maintain body heat, fight static electricity, reduce body odour and prevent chaffing. There is even light wear in special material for running cold and wet conditions too.

So what should you look for when you buy a running t-shirt?

Check the weather – If you are running in warm weather then ensure that you wear clothes that can wick moisture and keep you cool. If its harsh summer weather then it would be a good idea to go for a full-sleeved t-shirt to prevent sunburns. If its cooler weather then check for insulated sports wear. You can even add a light jacket over your dri-fit t-shirt.

Drying– Fabrics that dry quickly will keep you more comfortable longer. Even if you are stuck in light showers, these fabrics will dry out fast and help regulate your body temperature. The dri-fit t-shirts are made from polyester fibres and microfibre material that has the property to dry every quickly.

Chafe free seams –  The seams will be the most important part of the t-shirt while running long distance. You need to turn the T-shirt inside out and check if the seams are welded and flat. Especially around your shoulders and arm holes. A badly stitched seam will cause irritation during run and impede your natural running style.

Mesh Vents – Many t-shirts come with mesh vents on the back and underarms. These will help you cool down faster. If you are running long distance then these style of t-shirts will be more beneficial.

Sleeve Length – Long distance runners generally tend to prefer sleeveless t-shirts. But this may not be suitable in all weather conditions. The regular t-shirt sleeve should be wide and unobstructed. There are several new brands that have 3/4th length sleeves but this may not be suitable for all. If you are wearing a long sleeved t-shirt, ensure that the sleeve has flat seams that do not rub against your arms while you run.

Inner liner – A few brands sell t-shirts with inner liners to prevent chaffing. Chaffing injuries can be very painful during a run so its best to wear a t-shirt that will avoid this situation for you.

Reflective Fabrics – It is important that you are visible to others while you run early mornings. If you are not wearing a bright t-shirt then you need to add reflective strips to your t-shirt. You get reflective strips that stick to clothing and are not affected by sweat, you can choose from brands like 3M. You also get running t-shirts that have reflective strips on the front and back.

When you are on a run be careful not to overdress. You body tends to heat up during a run and its important that your t-shirt also aids in the cool down.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

 

An irregular runner who has run in dry, wet, high altitude and humid conditions. Loves to write a little more than run so now is the managing editor of Finisher Magazine.

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