Featured, Motivation Comments Off on How to consistently click miles every week |

How to consistently click miles every week

With an insatiable appetite for running, Divya Vasishta has quite a story to tell. In this conversation with Deepthi Velkur, she explains what drives her passion.

“The mountains are calling and I must go” – John Muir (Naturalist and Preservationist).

Probably one of the most compelling quotes that says it all for many outdoor lovers and definitely apt for our guest today – Divya Vasishta.

Divya hails from Dharamshala, Himachal Pradesh, a scenic mountain town, so it’s no wonder that her runs always seem to take her to the hills.

She is by no means a career runner – running happened by accident 5 years ago and she juggles a busy corporate life (quality head with a US-based organization) with her undying passion for running and the mountains.

Her running timeline might be short but she has covered the spectrum – countless 10Ks, Half-Marathons, Full-Marathons, Trail Running and also Ultra runs.

We had ourselves a tête-à-tête and I was fascinated by her story. Read on and chances are you will be too.

FM: It’s been 5 years since you started running, what inspired you to pick up such a tough endurance sport?

Divya: I never liked running on a treadmill but I had to for a long time as I spent quite a few years in Canada and the severe winters made it hard to run outdoors. A few years later though, I moved to California famed for its gorgeous weather and scenery, I started to head out for my runs every day for about 30 mins.

After having spent 10 years out of the country, we decided to move back to Bangalore. It was definitely a huge change for me. The weekends seemed empty with nowhere to go camping, no hills to climb, no trails to walk on and I ended up running longer durations inside my housing layout.

Initially, it started out as an aimless activity until a friend suggested that I participate in a 10k run back in 2013 to begin with, which I did and the experience of the race was enthralling. That paved the way forward and I have never looked back since. For the first two years, the focus was to improve my timings and then later on, I focused on building and testing my endurance and this became a vicious cycle with no end.

No distance ever seemed enough for me initially. I was curious to see how much further I could go and fast forward 3 years, I have run a maximum distance of 100K in 14 hours 20 minutes in the Bangalore Ultra. I also completed the Khardung La Challenge in Leh (the world’s highest Ultra marathon at 17582 feet) a distance of 72K.

Since 2013, I have completed 13 Ultra events and countless half and full marathons. I always enjoyed runs that are challenging with a sole purpose of finishing them comfortably and maintaining a constant pace. I personally prefer the quieter and smaller events and always look forward to trying new routes with new organisers.

The first 2 years of my running life took me to different locales but it was always the hills that kept calling and brought me a kind of peace that I couldn’t find anywhere else.

Having discovered running in the hills, I have completed events in Ooty, Munnar, Manipur, Leh, Manali (Solang Sky running – being the toughest so far) as well as Shimla.  This year, I became the 3rdfemale runner from India to run the Everest marathon.

I haven’t limited myself just to running in the hills obviously – I enjoy running in California and completed the Big Sur marathon which is considered a beautiful run but very challenging owing to the weather conditions. I have also completed a 143.9K run during the 24-hour Bangalore stadium run last year.

FM: Fascinating and amazing to see what you have achieved in 5 years. Prior to 2013, what kind of sports where you in to?

Divya: I have always been an active and outdoorsy person. Back in school, I loved running on the tracks and tried my hand at different sports like field and track events, basketball, hockey and mini marathons. With college and the initial few years of working, these activities took a backseat. Post marriage, my partner and myself started going on short treks in our free time. Hitting the gym became a part of my daily routine. In 2006, step aerobics fascinated me and quickly became one of my favourite activity. We (my partner and myself) had done a few treks of which the Machu Picchu, few in Alaska and the Everest Base Camp clearly were my favourites. Between 2010-13, I appointed a personal trainer and he used to set up various routines for me and then it was only in 2013, that I started running.

FM: That explains the ease with which you have acclimatized yourself to ultra-running.  This is me being curious – how was your lifestyle prior and how has that changed since you started running?

Divya: In terms of routine, not much has changed in my life. I have always been disciplined in everything I do. Early rising, timely intake of food and hitting the bed early has been my routine for the longest time. Food habits have changed for the better. For instance, I used to eat a lot of processed food and that has completely stopped now. I prefer eating fresh home-cooked meals and drinking natural juices. 

FM: Managing your professional, personal as well passion for running takes a lot out of a person. How do you manage this and what do you do to unwind?

Divya: I really didn’t have to make a lot of compromises. I started running when I was well-settled at work. There was no need to commute to work daily and work related travel was manageable too and was a part of my routine life. Both my husband and myself are morning people. I just had to wake up a little earlier so I could clear up any work-related emails and then head out for my morning run. While travelling, it becomes a bit hard to manage my runs so I make sure to manage expectations during those days and plan my work and running accordingly. And I never forget to pack my running shoes wherever I go.

Running is relaxing for me, but a spa appointment for a deep tissue massage and foot reflexology is a reward for myself (smiles).

FM: To be able to clock 9455Km in such a short time is astounding. Did you imagine you would have achieved this in less than 5 years? Do you set at a yearly target for yourself?

Divya: I was never interested in numbers, like setting up a monthly or yearly target. What I do is set myself a mileage target of 60K every week and try to achieve it on most days. My tally seems very less in comparison to other Ultra runners. But I feel, if I run a lot (especially training runs), I’ll probably start disliking running so I run the tracks I enjoy. Sometimes a training run of 35K stresses me but at the same time I enjoy running a 100K event.

FM: Another mind-boggling statistic is the fact that you have a podium finish in greater than 50% of the events you have participated? What are the 3 key factors that help you achieve this?

Divya: You are right. Out of 55 events, I’ve had about 27 podiums wins. I would say – It just happened. Though I’ve had podiums in the open category too but most of them have been in 45+ age category, so being a veteran probably led to this and I see it as an advantage. I really don’t run with a competitive mind.

FM: Congratulations on finishing the Comrades marathon last year – such a fascinating run especially given its origins. What interested you in taking part in this event?

Divya: Curiosity, I think. I wanted to see why runners are so crazy about this run and I guess I did find my answer. It’s a run with an amazing aura. I finished the race which is approximately a 89KM run from Durban to Pietermaritzburg, South Africa. It is considered the World’s Largest and one of the oldest Ultra-marathons, which was first held in 1921. The race has very strict cut-off time of 12hours and I managed to finish it in 11 hrs and 42 minutes. 

FM: Obviously, your training program for this run would have been different from your normal training. Can you please share a few snippets into the differences?

Divya: One needs to be diligent and disciplined in preparing for any targeted run, especially a run as challenging as this with strict cut-off points. It only tends to increase the pressure which may lead to unnecessary stress.

My goal was just to finish the run within the cut-off time and with that in mind, I prepared my own training plan and stayed within my normal weekly mileage, with an exception of 2 or 3 weeks where I exceeded it. I also added hill runs to my routine, almost every weekend and most of the events I went to were in the hilly terrains which got me stepping out of my regular running route. Being the only female from Bangalore to participate in this event that year, I had to look for a group running this event. The drive to the location for the training runs was quite far from my place and that led me to start driving in India, which I dislike doing, especially during the dark, early morning hours. I don’t remember missing a single run as per my calendar.

FM: So, where is your next big run and what plans do you have for the next few months?

Divya: A 100 miler in a decent time for sure.

 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

 

Deepthi Velkur is a former sprinter who is trying her hand at various sports today. A tennis fanatic, who believes that sleep should never be compromised.

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Featured, Motivation Comments Off on Seeing the world one trail at a time |

Seeing the world one trail at a time

Deepthi Velkur talks to the first Indian Woman, Aakriti Verma to have taken part in the World Trail Championship.

“Do not go where the path may lead, go instead where there is no path and leave a trail”

Aakriti Verma certainly wants to live up to this inspiring quote. With a little over four years of running experience, she has already achieved the adulating distinction of being the only Indian woman to take part at the World Trail Championships.

A HR professional with a leading IT firm for the past 6 years, Aakriti uses her national-level swimming experience to cross-train along with the runs. Her focus is not on clocking a heap of miles on a daily basis, instead she sets targets for each run and pushes herself to achieve it.

Apart from competing at the world championships, Aakriti has been a podium finisher in major running events such as Urban Stampede, Malnad Ultra, Jawadhu Hill Ultra, Yercaud Hills Ultra, Bull hill 50k run across the country in distances ranging from 5KM to 100 KM. She is also an Ironman distance triathlon finisher. Phew!

As if that wasn’t energy-sapping enough, she finds time to conduct daily fitness sessions for more than 500 colleagues as well as organizing running events at her organization.

Excerpts from our conversation

HR professional to long-distance enthusiast to being the 1stIndian woman at the IAU Trail World championship, you sure where a lot of hats. How do you manage to keep it all together?

It has never been easy as there is a lot of hard work, sacrifice and discipline behind it. Time management is also the key and you need to manage your time well to excel at work and also make time for your training. So, I prioritize much of my time for work during the weekdays and for training and races on the weekends.

You were a national-level swimmer at school and still use it as part of your fitness regime. How has that helped your transition into long-distance running? 

Swimming is the best sport which involves movement of all the muscles in your body and surely helps to build a lot of stamina. This is definitely the best cross training workout for runners and also helps in my recovery process. I resumed swimming after college to train for my triathlons, though my focus for the last year has been towards running ultra-marathons.

You have been into long-distance running for nearly 4 years now and since the past year, you have focused more on trail running. What piqued your interest into that specific area?

I started off with running 5K and 10K’s and took up long distance running only in last couple of years. Trail running has definitely interested me more as I feel it is more challenging and you spend your time close to nature mostly in the mountains which attracts me to this sport.

Being the first woman to be a part of a 6-member team representing the country at the 2018 IAU Trail World Championship in Spain is a ground-breaking achievement. How did you feel when you heard the news and was there any sort of pressure on you?

It was indeed a proud moment for me to be part of the Indian team. This being my first appearance in an international race, it was a mix of excitement and pressure as I was the only female to represent India in this sport. Hopefully I would be paving the way for lot of other females to build themselves in this sport.

You needed to accumulate 500 ITRA (International Trail running association) points to qualify and be a part of the Indian team at the Trail World Championship. How did you go about achieving that?

To be honest, I wasn’t focusing much on my cotation points. All I did was to participate in most of the trail ultras across India and give my best at every race. The cutoff points for female runners last year was 500 and I was lucky enough to get 530 odd points through my Malnad Ultra.

The world championship course I’m sure was very technical. Can you tell us something more about the course?

The terrain was very technical and it was my first time being on these trails and they are quite different from the trails in India which are rather smooth runnable trails. Most of the sections of the race were uphill and downhill which made it even more challenging. Apart from the technicality, the stiff intermediate cutoffs made the race that much more tough.

In Spain, you had to come off after more than half the race was done. What was the challenge and where do you see as areas you need to work on?

I would have been able to complete the race irrespective of the difficulty and technicality but the stiff intermediate cutoffs were a huge challenge due to which I had to pull off from the race. By spending more time training in such technical trails found mostly in the Himalayan range will definitely help me tackle such courses better.

How many races have you ran in India and overseas? Which has been the most treasured race till date? Why?

I have run more than 29 races across India and one international race. The most treasured race is definitely the Solang Sky Ultra organized by The Hell Race team. This is the only race in India that comes close to the technical trails found in Europe. This race has given me immense learning, helped me overcome my fear of running technical sections along the trail and has enhanced me to train myself better. I was extremely delighted as I was the only female runner to have finished the race within the cutoff time till date.

For trail running in specific, is there a specific training you need to follow as opposed to running a regular marathon?

Yes, there is a vast difference as the training required for trail ultra-running is completely different versus road marathon training. To run trails, you need to spend lot of time running in the mountains, plan your nutrition, hydration, training in high altitudes, running with backpacks etc.

What races do you plan on taking part in for the remaining part of the year?

With the running season almost coming to an end, I am glad that I participated in some new races this year like Solang Sky Ultra, Mawkyrwat Ultra. Next, I plan to run the SRT (Sinhagad-Rajgad-Torna)Ultra and Vagamon Ultrail next year.

Follow Aakriti’s running journey on Instagram:  https://www.instagram.com/aakritiverma06/  

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

 

Deepthi Velkur is a former sprinter who is trying her hand at various sports today. A tennis fanatic, who believes that sleep should never be compromised.

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Featured, Motivation Comments Off on All conquering Triathlete |

All conquering Triathlete

In conversation with Siddhant Chauhan, Nandini Reddy finds out how this Corporate Communications expert became a certified Ironman Coach. 

Siddhant Chauhan, 36 yrs, working as Deputy General Manager – Corporate Communications and CSR with Nissan Motors India. He is also an Ironman Certified Triathlon Coach (completed last year) and Assistant Coach with Yoska under Deepak Raj. He recently completed the Cetlman – Extreme Scottish Triathlon is considered to be one of the toughest triathlons in the world which has seen only 1200 participants from across the world since its inception in 2012.

Triathlons completed so far Ironman 70.3 Bintan 2016, Ironman Nice 2017. Super Randonneour for the 2016-17 season.

Being a triathlete isn’t a decision that many people make, how did you decide to become one?

You are right. It wasn’t an overnight decision. I got introduced to the concept of triathlon at a time when I wasn’t pursuing any of the three disciplines required. On the contrary, my lifestyle was quite sedentary. I hated long distance running and when you stack it towards the end of a triathlon, it was definitely not the most attractive proposition. So I first began by getting comfortable with running and eventually cycling. And one thing led to the other.

At what stage of your journey are you as a triathlete?

In 2014 when I was working for Reckitt Benckiser India, then CEO Nitish Kapoor threw a challenge of running a half marathon and raising funds for our charity partner. I guess once I was able to successfully finish a half marathon, it gave me a confidence that I can take a shot at doing a triathlon. However, it was a step by step process and as you rightly said, it did not happen overnight.

 

What is your advice to anyone who wants to take up an endurance sport?

I am an amateur in endurance events, but with whatever limited experience I have, my advice will be:

  1. Have a goal and chalk out a roadmap to achieve that
  2. Invest in a good coach for a structured training
  3. Building mental toughness is as important physical endurance
  4. Focus on nutrition and recovery
  5. And of course, compete with yourself first to become better at it

It takes a lot of mental strength to reach the finish line, how do you motivate yourself to keep going?

Absolutely! With a regular job and family, it is tough to dedicate hours towards training day after day. It is fairly easy to get off the track, but you need to keep reminding yourself why you are doing this. It has to be for your own self instead of any other ulterior motive. You practice this through your training blocks and on race day, you give your 100%.

The day before the big race, how do you prepare yourself?

It is not just about the day before your race, one has to get into the mould through the week building up to race day. I run the simulation of this build up during my training blocks and it has helped me. On the day before, I try to keep myself as relaxed as I possibly can and get a good sleep. I keep a close watch on what I eat and it is an important part of feeling good on the race day. On the lighter note, the intensity of the peak week can often make the race day feel like a cakewalk.

Earlier this year you conquered the Celtman, how was the experience?

Once in a lifetime experience – the intensity of this extreme triathlon cannot be comprehended by the race video or report. The course is tough and the weather is harsh.

To give you a quick view of what it entails:

  • SWIM – 3.4K in cold (11 degrees), deep and jellyfish infested Atlantic waters
  • BIKE – 202K through cold, rain and winds through Scottish Highland roads
  • RUN – 42K over the Beinn Eighe mountain range (trail)

Celtman

From swimming in 11 degrees lake infested with jellyfish and riding in rain and cold winds to running across a brutal trail, there is no one part of the race which is easier than the other. It was quite a challenge for me as I trained for the event in conditions which were exactly opposite to what the race offered.

Watch a short video of the race – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XaniAKBzoRg 

Do you follow a specific or special diet and nutrition plan?

Yes, I follow certain guidelines for my diet during training. And of course, nutrition I believe is the 4thpillar of triathlon – extremely important to fuel your body right to take you through the gruelling day in the field

Do you have a particular race that is at the top of your wish list?

Yes, Norseman and Swissman extreme triathlons are on my wishlist.

Who is your role model who inspires you to keep aiming higher?

If you look around, there are enough and more role models who inspire you to keep moving despite challenges in life. But if you ask me for one, it has always been Michael Jordan since my childhood days. But particularly in the sport of triathlon, there are so many pros who perform at unimaginable levels and it is always inspiring.

What is next on your agenda of races? 

For 2019, my focus is to improve my timing for a full marathon, aim for the races in my wish list and aim for ITT nationals.

 

You can follow Siddhant’s journey on Instagram – https://www.instagram.com/siddhantchauhan/  

 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

 

An irregular runner who has run in dry, wet, high altitude and humid conditions. Loves to write a little more than run so now is the managing editor of Finisher Magazine.

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Motivation Comments Off on Being a runner in a busy world |

Being a runner in a busy world

24 hours never seems enough.How we juggle all facets of our lives and make time to stay fit? Difficult? Not so much, says our guest columnist Sagar Baheti.  

Anything is possible, but you have to believe and you have to fight.”

A famous line quoted by someone (not a runner!) who is familiar with racing and hard work, the indomitable Lance Armstrong. This quote serves as an inspiration no matter what challenges life throws at us.

“I haven’t got the time” is probably the number one reason we give for not running or just doing regular exercise itself.

True, life does get really busy sometimes and everything else in life is always more important, but making your run a priority will probably be one of the best things you’ll ever do for yourself.

For now, put your feet up and take some time to read how you can make time and plan your life around running.

The perfect way to run and live

An ideal day would be to wake up early (6 AM!), get your pre-run nutrition sorted and head out for a warm-up before an intensive session of running kicks in. Post the long-run, spend a few minutes doing a few strengthening exercises and cooling off with some stretching. With the morning workout, all done, have a good nutritious breakfast to supplement the workout and then take a nap or perhaps a sports massage. During the day, have your meals on time and get in the second workout around 5 PM before heading home and hitting the bed by 9 PM to make sure you get at least 8-9 hours of sleep. This needs to be on repeat!

How fantastic it would be if we were paid to live like this, huh? Unfortunately, barring the elites, very few of us can enjoy such luxuries. We cannot follow such a schedule even on a holiday let alone a working day!

The never-ending demands of this competitive world – career, family responsibilities, social obligations, relationships, priorities, the relentless Bangalore traffic – all of these come in the way of the ideal running day.

For me, my top priorities are being available for my family and to support the growth and well-being of those directly or indirectly dependent on me through my business venture.

I always keep these two priorities in mind when I look at a training run or an event and decide if I want to do it or not. When making a choice, it is important that your priorities are clear and you know where fitness fits into your life. With this clear mindset, you will be able to run with the right perspective in mind.

Ideas to make a runner out of you

I took a shot at drawing up a few ideas that will help you start running or continue running despite the myriad of responsibilities we are all laden with.

+) Make short-term goals. Write it down like your own weekly plan. It’s often easier to plan for the short-term and factor in your schedule and responsibilities.

+) Be flexible. It’s ok if you did a workout in the evening instead of a morning when you have an emergency meeting or you’ve had a late night. It’s also alright to have two run days back to back if you’ve had to miss one for whatever reason. It’s better to do this than miss it completely.

+) Don’t overdo it.Working out twice a day is ok if not done too frequently. If you are training for a specific event and have some mileage planned for the week, you can see how to fit it into your schedule and run twice in one day to get more miles.

+) Be prepared.Carry your running gear with you at all times. I keep it in my car. If I get a time window at work where it’s possible to get out for an hour, I go for a quick run. I know people who do the same when they take kids to classes and use the waiting time to get their runs.

+) Clear it out in the morning. Getting it done first thing in the morning is a great advantage. Starting your day early would mean that the pressure of making time for your run in the midst of a busy day is not on your mind.

+) Don’t procrastinate.Don’t give in to the thought of, “I’ll start fresh next week and follow my schedule”. If you’ve missed a few workouts, but on a comparatively free day you consider skipping it so that you can start it right the following week, then reconsider. It’s better to get even one run that week than none.

+) Use the best option available.Running on a treadmill is a great option for travellers. I travel for more than a hundred days a year and use treadmills at hotels whenever possible.

These are some of the things that I do to be consistent and make the best of what I have, never for once forgetting my priorities. This also helps me stay stress-free during my non-running phases as well as helping my come back to running when my other priorities are sorted.

Small things you could do to staying fit –

+) Always take the stairs – this is a quick workout on a busy day.

+) Walk around with strap-on leg weights at home.

+) Plug in a workout during an outing. For eg: use a pedal boat on a lake, get a swim in at the hotel.

Consistency and focus are two weapons that will take your forward, not just with running or fitness but anything in life.

Enjoy your runs and keep at it. Life is an outcome of the choices we make.

 

GUEST COLUMNIST

 

Sagar Baheti, an amateur runner and cyclist from Bangalore who runs a successful import and export stone business and in 2017 was the first ever visually impaired runner from India to successfully complete the Boston marathon.

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Featured, Motivation Comments Off on Meet the 22-time Ironman from Pune |

Meet the 22-time Ironman from Pune

Protima Tiwary catches up with the man who finished his first Ironman in under 12 hours, Kaustubh Radkar.

India’s first Ironman, Fastest Indian of the Year, 22 Ironman Finisher title holder, swimming champion and an inspiration to many, Kaustubh Radkar says he lives for the Ironman World Championships. We caught up with him for a quick chat about what keeps him going for those 17 hours.

What made you opt for the Ironman?

I grew up as a swimmer, with 1995-2000 being my best years where I was the Indian National Champion in various events. In 2001 I won a swimming scholarship and made my way to the United States of America. I kept at it for a couple of years before ending my swimming career. Now see, I was used to extremely high levels of fitness. I had to replace my swimming training with something else, and I realised running was the easiest way to do it. Since I was a long distance swimmer, I also opted for long distance running. I ran my first NYC Marathon in 2016 and have never looked back since then.

But being an Ironman finisher at 22 championships, people forget that I am a runner too, and only treat me as an Ironman athlete. I am not complaining though! Ironman has been my passion for over ten years now. It’s been the reason I wake up with a purpose.

So what you’re saying is…you’re not just a marathoner, you’re an Ironman! What has been the highlight of your ironman career?

With 22 Ironman championships under my belt, I have a bunch of high moments that define my career. I could go on and on, but the top ones would be the time when I finished my FIRST Ironman in 11 hours 41 minutes in Arizona. 29th March 2015, Port Elizabeth, South Africa is also special since it was the day I completed Ironman in all 6 continents. Another one would be qualifying for and finishing the Ironman World Championships at Kona.

Marathons don’t always go perfectly. Any moment you’d like to share with us where you thought things were going downhill? How did you overcome that?

I had just finished Ironman Wisconsin on September 9th, 2017 and was at the start line of the coveted Berlin Marathon in just 2 weeks!  The first 23-25kms went right on pace, and then things started to fall apart.

Having enough racing experience, I was able to cool off and managed to finish the Berlin Marathon in 3 hrs 26 mins.  When things go wrong, it always comes down to what happens in your mind.  Having a mantra for this time helps a lot; it has certainly helped me and my trainees.  “Mind Over Matter” is what we chant when things are not looking too good.

What did you learn from your worst and best races?

Ironman is all about discipline and consistency, and you have to put in a lot of hard work. You might have enjoyed the best race and might be supremely talented and strong, but each Ironman is a different experience and you cannot let go of hard work. From my best races, I have learnt humility and discipline. One race does not define you- a fact that I keep sharing with my trainees.

From my worst races, I have learnt how staying positive is the difference between giving up and finding a way to solve a problem and finish a race.  It’s very easy to be down on yourself after a bad race, and how you react is what separates the great from the average.

As a runner, what is the one quality that defines you?

Willpower! If you were to ask my family, my willpower has defined me throughout my life.

They say consistency is key – but how do you build this consistent pace that they talk about?

We all have goals when it comes to running. We want to run faster or run at consistent paces throughout workouts and races.  As runners, we dedicate time every week to target speed, tempo, long runs etc. But it’s crucial for longevity to invest time in other aspects such as strength training, core work and of course, diet.

Strength training, flexibility, core work is essential to gain time and endurance, but more importantly to stay injury free. A lot of times people complain they are either stuck at a certain pace or not able to achieve consistency. It’s because the focus has been on running only, and not the diet and strength training.

Could you share your training routine with us?  

As a full-time coach, a lot of my training now happens with trainees all over the country. I run thrice a week (typically Tuesday, Thursday and Sunday) and I also do some indoor bike training every Wednesday. I also hit the gym on Wednesdays and Fridays. Saturdays are for outdoor bike training.
Swimming is my strength, and I do 2 short sessions of 30 mins in the pool on Tuesdays and Thursdays, and Fridays are for the long distance swimming sessions.  I also add in a couple of sessions of yoga in my training schedule.

An ultra-marathon is a combination of mental and physical strength- any tips you’d like to share with us on how to stay strong during the race? 

My last Ultramarathon was the Comrades 89.2kms in May 2016.   I ran an 8 hrs 47 mins race that year and ended up as the fastest Indian that year.  If you have trained well, during the training itself you have moments where you face your fears, start questioning yourself and find ways to overcome those.

Ultramarathon training involves setting a strong strategy and then being patient.  Far too often athletes steer away from their plan due to the excitement of the event.  Even at Comrades, I had told myself that the race doesn’t even start till 60kms, that I must be patient.

The Ironman Triathlon organized by the World Triathlon Corporation entails a 3.86-km swim, 180.25-km bicycle ride and a 42.2-km marathon that must be completed within 17 hours. For most of us, simply reading the distances is a daunting task. But for supermen like Kaustubh Radkar, it’s a way of life. Thank you for being such an inspiration to the running and marathon community in India!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

An Army kid who wishes to travel the world one wellness vacation at a time, Protima Tiwary is a freelance content writer by day and Dumbbells and Drama, a fitness blogger by night. High on love and life, she is mildly obsessed about travelling and to-do lists and loves her long gym sessions like a fat kid loves cake.

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Featured, Motivation Comments Off on Amateur marathoner with big dreams |

Amateur marathoner with big dreams

Pune based Kavitha Reddy talks to Deepthi Velkur about how she caught the running bug.

Based out Pune for the past 10 years, Kavitha’s story can be encapsulated by George Elliot’s phrase “It is never too late to be what you might have been”.

A 43-year woman with two teenage sons, Kavitha is a small-town girl who grew up in Anantapur (Andhra Pradesh). Growing up, her father insisted that she stay active and despite not being a sportsperson in school, she followed her father’s words and lead an active lifestyle. She has been a marathoner for the past 5 years now and has completed 3 out of the 6 major marathons worldwide. I had a chance to talk with her on how did she transform her life.

You did play a bit of basketball in your younger days but running was never a fascination. What changed? How did running become so serious?

Growing up, I was never really into sports though I did some free play. Once my boys grew up, I had a lot of time to myself and wanted to do something for me. In 2009, I was diagnosed with hypo-thyroid and coupled with seeing my mother suffer from thyroid and arthritis, it really shook me into action.

I started with going to the gym thrice a week. During a chat with a close friend, long distance running came up and on doing some research, I found a running group called The Pune Road Runners club that trained at the racecourse. On September 19th 2013, I laced up my running shoes and joined the group for a run. I have never looked back!

Consistency is key? How did you make running your habit?

It is in my nature to be consistent. If I start something, I give it my complete focus and that really has been the key to my achievements. Further, it motivates me to achieve more.

At the start, I needed some time to figure out how to manage my time, kids, school but slowly I was able to balance it out. Obviously, there were hurdles but when you enjoy something, you find a way to overcome them.

Your dream is to run the 6 iconic World Marathon Majors. So far, you have done 3 – New York, Boston, and Berlin. Please share some snippets from each of these events?

Running the World Marathon Majors, a circuit of 6 iconic races around the world is my cherished dream. In 2017, I was accepted into the TCS New York marathon after my partner’s office recommended me. New York was the first of the 6 majors and I was super ecstatic about it. The course is very technical and challenging – plenty of hills, climbs / flyovers.

In April 2018, I ran the Boston marathon for which I waited 18 months post my qualification. The 2018 run had awful weather conditions with runners encountering the coldest conditions in 2 decades with rain, wind and snow reducing visibility drastically.
Two months ago (September 2018), I ran the Berlin marathon and clocked a personal best of 3hours and 28 mins.

Qualifying for the World Majors is no walk in the park? What challenges did you face while doing this?

Yes, there were setbacks and challenges. I have had bad workouts and a couple of bad races in the lead up to the 2016 Amsterdam Marathon, this happened due to a fall I had, which fractured my hand and I had to train with a cast on which was removed only a week before the race.

How did you train yourself for these marathon majors? Was it any different from training for a marathon in India?

Other than course specific training tweaks, overall it was the same training that was followed.

For New York, I included a lot of climbs / flyovers in my training as the course has the same. For Boston, my coach added mileage and tweaked the workouts to make me stronger to tackle the Boston route profile. He prescribed rolling routes for my training runs and tempo runs, included hill runs in the second half of my long runs and lastly, some fast finish long runs.

Berlin is a flat course, so I just concentrated on pace building with fast finish runs.

Despite such adverse weather predicted for the Boston Marathon this year, you still managed to clock the marathon in 3hours 38mins in your age category? How did you mentally prepare yourself for the race and did it go as per plan?

It was a nightmare! The weather was terrible and I could hear the howling of the cold winds. To make matters worse, it was raining and snowing. I was very depressed and had my doubts if I could run in such conditions. It appeared that all my hard work for the past 3 months would amount to nothing.

But then, I figured that all runners are facing the same conditions, so if I made my mind stronger, I could deal with this thing. Nevertheless, I started the race with doubts in my head but eventually, I got into a rhythm and regained some confidence.

I kept thinking of all the encouraging messages that I received from friends and family before the race and I felt a sudden surge of divine energy inside me. I renewed my resolve to fight it out and take on the upcoming hills strongly.

Another challenge was poor visibility due to rains and the huge crowds of runners which was quite intimidating. But in the end, I surprised myself by fighting it out bravely till the end and finished with a smile and great pride in a time of 3hours 34mins.

How many races have you participated in India and overseas? Which has been the best course you have run so far and why?

I have done 9 full marathons so far. 5 in India which includes ADHM, SPBM, SCMM(3) and 4 overseas ( Amsterdam, New York, Boston, and Berlin). I have also done countless half marathons and 10Ks.

The best race for me so far is my first FM at Hyderabad ( the first one is always special as I believed in myself and set out to do something which I thought I was incapable of doing). Following that closely was my most recent Berlin Marathon – that was one race where I was so consistent and strong from the start to the finish line.

How has joining motive8 coaching improved your performance and how is it helping your goal of achieving to qualify for the remaining 3 majors?

I joined Motiv8 Coaching in 2015 after I ran the Bengaluru marathon (my 3rd full marathon) and clocked my first sub-4 time of 3hours 53mins. It was then that I took seriously the possibility of qualifying for the Boston Marathon. I also realized that to improve further and achieve that target, I would require some personalized training and train in a more structured and scientific manner. Though I had run 2 full marathons earlier, I never had any fixed workouts and paces for my runs but just ran at a comfortable pace. After I started my coaching, there was a lot more structure and variety in the workouts as well as pace guidance and other details to each workout which I was unaware of earlier. That has helped me a lot.

I have run 6 full marathons after joining Motiv8. With each marathon, I have only improved myself and come out stronger. The focus for the next 3 majors is to do the same with steady improvement while remaining injury free.

What are the major differences you see between running in India and running overseas?

Running has picked up in our country in the last 6-7 years but I feel it still has a long way to go. The ecosystem developed around running overseas is a major plus point. People respect, value and understand the sport and this makes it extra special running in these events.

In the pursuit of achieving your dream, what are the lifestyle changes that you had to make and was your family supportive of this change?

I haven’t made too many lifestyle changes to achieve this. The only and most difficult one was missing my mornings with my family. But I am very lucky that I do not have a very demanding family and they supported me endlessly in my journey.

Yes, a few changes automatically come along with a new schedule. My day used to start early before, but now it starts even earlier with packing lunch boxes and then stepping out for training. My social circle now has more running friends. Overall, my lifestyle has changed for the better.

What is your message to many women out there who are sckeptical to take up running or fitness?

These are the following mental blocks I heard from many women around
when I began running and also during training – Are you not affecting your knees?
Are you not affected by hormonal changes? Is it safe to run on the roads? How safe are you running alone? How do you run during your menstrual cycle? How to take time out of kids’ schedule? How do you balance both your home and your passion?

All these questions are only present until you make a beginning. My personal experience is that everything falls in place if you enjoy doing what you do and learn how to balance it all. Your family will support you when you show your commitment to what you do. Personally, I am blessed to have very supportive kids and a spouse for letting me pursue my passion. At the same time, I take care of my responsibilities well to maintain that balance.

Despite starting to run late in my 30’s, I do not see this as a disadvantage. In the end, age is just a number, you can set goals at any age and achieve it if you are determined.

What is the next race in your race calendar for this year and your plans for 2019?
My next full marathon is next year. Currently, I am focusing on core, strength, and speed till I start my training for my 4th marathon major which is the London Marathon in April 2019. After that, my 5th one will be the Chicago Marathon in October 2019.

You can follow Kavitha’s journey on Instagram – https://www.instagram.com/deepak.kavitha/  

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

 

Deepthi Velkur is a former sprinter who is trying her hand at various sports today. A tennis fanatic, who believes that sleep should never be compromised.

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Featured, Motivation Comments Off on Ride every Mountain |

Ride every Mountain

Kiran Kumar Raju, mountain biking national champion has the 2020 Olympics in his sights, talks to Deepthi Velkur.

K Kiran Kumar Raju or KKR as he is fondly known is a Bangalore-based mountain biking (MTB) professional who has been crowned national MTB champion this year. Apart from MTB, Kiran has also achieved success in other cycling disciplines such as road racing and Duathlons.

A civil engineer by profession and a sporting ninja by choice, Kiran has dabbled in hockey, table tennis, cross country running at the university level. Realizing his passion lies in cycling, he decided to leave the corporate rat race and instead, chase his dreams on a cycle! Peeking into his cycling statistics will leave you aghast – 125+ races completed, 76+ podium finishes, 41+ 1st place finishes across road races, MTB and Duathlons.

I had the opportunity to talk to Kiran and was very interested to see how this former civil engineer plans to ride all the way to Tokyo 2020.

You’re a fairly busy person – active in hockey, table tennis and cross-country running. How did the switch to cycling happen?

I have always enjoyed sports and keeping active. In college, I had access to different sports and always kept myself engaged. I was University hockey captain at Manipal University, represented the college at Table Tennis and cross country running.

In 2010, I was working in Bangalore with Mantri developers and the famous Bangalore traffic was getting worse. Cycling appeared to be the only viable option to cover the distance of 40KMS. To me, it sounded like a good idea because apart from helping my commute, it was a great way to stay active.

My interest in cycling grew and I kept myself engaged with various city-wide events. Later in 2010, I heard about the Tour of Nilgiris (TFN), a grueling 7-day tour covering a distance of 900KMS and of course I volunteered. It was my first interaction with people from the cycling fraternity and I gathered heaps of information on different types of cycles, cycling events across Bangalore and India.

Armed with my new-found knowledge, I stepped up the number of races I took part the following year. I was at a disadvantage though – I never had a race competitive bike myself and had to borrow bikes for various races. I enjoyed the thrill of the race though and despite the competition, I was fairly successful.  My mode of training was still the 40KM daily commute.

As it happens with most of us, the busy work schedule took a toll on my other sporting interests. I lost focus on Table Tennis and Hockey but instead, I found time for Ultimate Frisbee which I did for 4 years with a club called Disco Deewane. My professional commitments also affected my cycling performance and I soon realized that cycling is where my passion lied. In 2014, I decided to let go of my well-paying job and chase my dreams on a cycle.

When did you realize mountain biking was your new passion?

Since 2011, I took part in road races as well as mountain biking (MTB). I enjoyed MTB more because unlike road racing where the focus is on power, MTB requires you to combine elements of power, technical skills, and endurance.

Being a notorious motorcycle rider, I was able to pick up bike handling skills faster than other riders and this gave me an edge over the other MTB riders in Bangalore.

How did you prepare for your first national MTB event?

My first national-level MTB event was in 2014 and since quitting my job in 2014, I was able to devote more time to training. People say cycling is an individual sport – I disagree. It is a team sport because it requires you to have a good coach, a supportive family, friends who not just help you financially but also motivate you.

My teammate decided to coach me for the event and I finished 7th across both events in my 1st national appearance back in 2014.

In my 2nd nationals in 2015, I won a gold in the Time-Trial event and 3rd place in the Mass-Start race. It was a very emotional moment for me and all that hard work and focus was paying dividends. I have been on the podium ever since.

What are the different races that you’ve been a part of till date?

I have taken part in all disciplines of cycling – road races, MTBs, and Duathlons. In 2011, I have also taken part in a brevet (an endurance ride that involves covering a target distance in a target time). I was advised to focus more on single-day short distance events instead, of a brevet. Till date (across 8 years), I have completed 125+ races throughout the country and overseas.

What kind of mental and physical skills do you need to participate in a brevet event? How is it different from any other course that you have traversed so far?

A Brevet event is more mental toughness than physicality and requires a lot of patience. Honestly, any race crossing the 6-hour mark requires a different sort of mental toughness. I could not dedicate my time training for these events but finished the entire randonneuring series just for the sheer joy of having completed it.

Personally, I do not recommend Brevet events for youngsters(<30yrs) in India. It is a day and night event, visibility is an issue and that carries too many risks and safety issues.

MTB or road events – what is more challenging and why?

Clearly, MTB is more challenging. Like I mentioned earlier, road racing is about power, endurance and the ability to control well enough at 50KMPH. MTB, on the other hand, requires a different skill set to excel, as here you need to select specific lanes along the trail which are faster and efficient, have exceptional bike handling skills, understand your bike well and quick reaction speeds.

How do you manage to juggle a young family and train for 400-600KMS each week?

It’s all about having the right support system. The credit goes to my family and my partner in specific who has backed me and given me all the support I need to focus on my cycling. My family is based out of Mysore while I do my training in Bangalore. I do my share of shuttling to ensure I spend quality time with my family in-between events.

When did your association with Trek Bicycle happen and how has your partnership been so far?

My 1st sponsorship was Kynkyny Wheel sports team and I have been associated with them between 2013 – 2016. Earlier this year, Trek Bicycle signed a 2-year endorsement deal and I am extremely thrilled to be associated with this brand as they are the most technologically advanced bicycling company in the world. They really understand my cycling needs and they seem quite happy with my achievements and apart from extending my contract for the next two years, they have also provided me with new advanced equipment to help pursue my future goals.

Yet another win at the MTB national event that happened between 26th-28th Oct in Pune? How did you prepare for it and did all go as per plan on the course?

I had a very clean race in both my categories – time trial (XCT) as well as the mass start (XCO). Time trail (XCT) is where you ride solo, finish 4 laps and basically race against the clock. Mass start (XCO) is where you start together and race each other.

My objective was to keep the rubber side down and avoid having a fall, push hard from start to finish and stick to the leading group for the initial lap and then set my own pace later.

From the start, my focus was winning the mass start as I had not won a gold in this category. Thankfully, everything went as per plan and I ended up with a silver in the time trial and a gold in the mass start (my first at the MTB event).

It was a huge achievement for me and a very humbling experience. I can now proudly say that I’m the “National Mountain Biking Champion” in India.

You have 2 key goals at the moment – represent India at the Asian Championships and then the 2020 Olympics. What are the steps you’re taking to achieve those dreams?

First, I had to prove to my country, sponsors, family and myself that I am India’s national MTB champion. With that out of the way now, I will use this time to rest well, recover and then start training in 2 weeks.

My focus now is to do well at the Asian championships in May 2019. Doing well here is my primary parameter to enter to the 2020 Olympics.

My training for the Asian championships will involve taking part in at least 4 races across Asia and then train for 2 months in Brisbane, Australia. When there, I will train and ride on trails that are more technical and challenging compared to India. I have already trained at Brisbane for 5 weeks prior to the nationals and that really helped me prepare well enough to win gold. This gives me the confidence to go back and spend more time training in those trails.

I have been at the Asian championships before, but compared to previous times I am a lot more confident now and with me being at the top of my game, I am aiming to finish in the Top 10.

What are the three most important things you need to do to cycle like a pro?

Discipline, dedication and a clean diet for at least six months prior to an event is what I do and anyone can achieve good results.

How difficult was it to make cycling a career choice?

Fairly difficult – unfortunately since cycling is not considered a big profession in India, it is challenging to make it a full-time career. What helped me was my family. They have been understanding, motivating and have supported me financially all the way through.

In India, you only get a medal and a certificate from the government for any national event across disciplines. The cash award applies only if it is an Olympic event. For e.g. the mass track event (XCO) is an Olympic sport and has cash awards unlike the time trial (XCT) which is not considered an Olympic sport. The national mountain biking riders are not offered a direct government job like the road racing champions.

I have been able to take up cycling full-time purely because of my family, sponsors, and well-wishers.

What are your thoughts on the current scenario of competitive cycling in Bangalore?

Bangalore is considered the cycling capital of India as we have the maximum number of races in the country. There is a fair bit of mountain bike races, road races that happen and attract riders from all over the country.

The races are handled very professionally, in a systematic and organized manner. Despite the fact that there are no cash awards, this has not deterred participants who take part for the sheer joy and experience of cycling.

I am thankful to Bangalore for creating this environment of cycling and my goal of winning the national and Asian championships are because of this. It is interesting to note that the national road biking and mountain biking champions are from Bangalore.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

 

Deepthi Velkur is a former sprinter who is trying her hand at various sports today. A tennis fanatic, who believes that sleep should never be compromised.

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Motivation Comments Off on Maffetone Method |

Maffetone Method

Marathoner Ajit Thandur speaks about the Maffetone Method that is aimed at reaching full human potential.

In my previous article titled Endurance and the Indian Runner, I had spoken about how amateur endurance running has so rapidly evolved in India over the last 15 years. The quest for fitness, weight loss, and good health has turned into a quest for speed and better timing, be it in running, bicycling or swimming.

Being an amateur runner and swimmer myself, I have often tried several techniques to improve myself. One method stands apart, I have found the Maffetone Method to be the most effective for me for the following reasons:

  1. You train your body to predominantly use aerobic muscles for energy during the endurance activity. Doing this helps to effectively use your body fat feed energy for the activity. In other words become ‘fat adapted’.
  2. With prolonged 180 Formula-based workouts, people who set out to do some form of endurance exercise for weight loss will benefit immensely.
  3. With this method, you can stay away from injuries due to excessive straining.
  4. Most importantly, as amateurs, we can keep ourselves fresh and agile through the day to work for our living and not feel lethargic or exhausted.

So, what is the Maffetone Method? How does one go about settling into the 180 Formula? How does one track development and be sure the training is right?

The MAF Method is a philosophy developed by Dr. Phil Maffetine over the course of 40 years of scientific research and clinical practice to help individuals of all ages, athletic abilities, physical issues, and personal goals reach their human performance potential.

Maximum Aerobic Function Test or the MAF Test is a key tool to keep track. The concept is simple, straightforward and easy to understand and follow.

How does it work? After determining your Threshold Aerobic Heart Rate, choose a convenient stretch along your favourite running route. Do a warm-up run of about 1KM, then using your HR monitor run 3KM keeping your HR at the Threshold Aerobic Heart Rate and record your pace for the distance.

Note this down. Typically it should look like this.

MAF Test dated:          at Threshold HR of:

Km          Pace

1               6:45

2               6:48

3               6:53

Repeat this test in the same format on the same route once every month. Ideally, you should do this for 6 months, though you might start seeing results as early as 3 months. The results I refer to is you achieving a faster pace at your Threshold Aerobic HR.

A few things to bear in mind:

  • The best way to achieve optimum results through the Maffetone Method / 180 Formula training is to do it alone because each of us have different thresholds.
  • If you’re doing it in as a group, you will tend to stay with the group and not required Heart Rate you need to be at.
  • Do not get upset when you start with this training, as you will not be able to maintain the same pace you have been running so far because you will invariably run at a lower heart rate than you have been running until now.
  • Happiness will dawn on you when your pace starts to get better and better at your constant Threshold Aerobic Heart Rate.
  • Most important of all, be patient!

There are certain factors other than just your pace that can affect your heart rate on certain days. It could be stress, lack of sleep, change in location/weather, lack of hydration, the unsuitable or irregular food you had the previous day. Always remember – 8 hours of sleep, rest and recovery after long runs/rides are of great importance.

What I have covered is a brief insight into the essence and benefits of the Maffetone Method and MAF Test. To know more and understand it even better, please go to this link:

https://philmaffetone.com/maf-test/

In conclusion, the Maffetone method is not a definitive step-by-step process to follow for faster results, instead, it is an approach that if followed well will help us make a healthier version of ourselves.

GUEST COLUMNIST

Ajit Thandur is an entrepreneur and amateur endurance runner/swimmer based in Mysuru taking a keen interest in injury-free training and nutrition. He also conducts Thonnur Swimathon, Tri Thonnur and a run race Chamundi Hill Challenge in Mysuru.

 

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Featured, Motivation Comments Off on The No Limits Runner |

The No Limits Runner

Nandini Reddy catches up with Dr NTR Balasubramanian, a person who cannot see a limit decides to try his hand at every endurance event. 
When the list of marathons reads long and tough you know you are talking to a runner who doesn’t even want to think of the limits. From the Satara Hill Marathon to the Devil’s circuit, from trail cycling to ultra-running, Dr NTR Balasubramanian has done it all. Bala is a freelance diabetologist by profession who takes his health very seriously. I caught up with him to understand how he manages to power through all these amazing acts of endurance.
Excerpts from the conversation
When did you start trying your hand at endurance sports?
After self-training for more than a year, I attempted the Wipro Chennai Marathon held in January 2017. I directly had a go at the half marathon skipping the 10 km run. The number of miles I had covered before the event was quite a considerable number that gave me the confidence to sign up for the half marathon in my maiden event. Running Gurus typically advise to taper down the mileage a week prior to the event and rest completely for a couple of days prior to the event. Since I wasn’t looped into the community yet, I didn’t know this and did the exact opposite. I ran 21.1 km by myself the day before the event, primarily to check if I could complete the run on the event day.
Of course, this then led to tight hamstrings and calf muscles on the event day, but despite this, I managed to finish with a decent timing for a novice marathoner.
What motivates you to pursue these endurance activities?
Health is my main motive. This includes both physical and mental health. Endurance athletes need as much mental stamina as physical to complete an event which may extend for up to 24 hours or more. I’ve done a couple of 12-hour events myself. Similar to physical stamina, one’s mental stamina also keeps improving with every event. The better your mental stamina, the better you are able to cope with challenges in daily life.
You seem to have made it a habit to pursue tougher endurance events each time – what special preparation do you do for facing the various challenges at these events?
[Laughs] It’s not my habit! Our bodies are endowed with a gift of getting fitter and fitter as we keep training. Most of the time it’s the mental block which prevents a person from tapping his or her body’s full potential. I keep pushing my limits gradually while training, be it the distance fixed for a long run, the duration held of an iron-man plank, the route length fixed for a ride on my bicycle and so on.

Coaches advise physical preparation for an event in which a few weeks before the event we are advised to split the challenge into half and work our way up to the final challenge. This way the body is given a drill to build up its stamina for the full event on the D-day. Mental preparation is important and starts from the day I register for the event. The mind adapts and gets attuned to the challenge at hand. An interesting fact is that an ultra-marathoner who can do 100 km run cannot cope up with an extra 25 km on a day when he has registered for a 50 km run.

The athlete who crosses the finish line in style will be found limping and difficult to walk on his way back to his home. This is because it all comes down to mental preparation. 
You completed the Satara Hill Marathon, considered to be a challenging hill marathon – your advice for anyone who wants to attempt this course?
Satara Hill Marathon is an event that challenges the athletes’ capacity to climb the hill with a 1000 metre elevation while running the uphill distance of 11 km. Running the same distance downhill also involves endurance and tolerance of your quadriceps. I would advice people attempting this to train on a hill path once a month as part of their training schedule. Flyover runs can mimic a hill run to an extent.
The Malnad Ultra trail is one of the most challenging trails for runners and cyclists, how did you decide to attempt this race? How was the experience?
I am an ardent nature lover and have an affinity for mountainous areas. Malnad Ultra aka the Coorg trail has a tough route and I wanted to take up this challenge. The route is entirely on the non-motorable paths in the hill. The scenery and weather were so tempting that an occasional runner will be found enjoying the experience and taking pictures without being worried about their timing or the possibility of not being able to finish before the cut-off time.
Due to the rains this year, the paths were very uneven and muddy. Luckily, I sweat much less since the weather was cold. The view from the summit at 1200 metres was fascinating. The streams the cut the running path and the sounds of birds signing added to the experience. There were many lakes and a huge one near the 40 km rest area, which is a prime location for clicking pictures. A couple of professional photographers pulled every runner from the track to capture the magical moment. The 50 km race I was participating in was flagged of at 7 am and I completed this in 8 hours 12 minutes with the cut off time being 9 hours. Though we were warned about leaches and snakes I didn’t come across any.
Mental preparedness is the most important factor for any endurance race, you have any special rituals that you follow to prepare your mind before a race?
I announce my participation to my friends and their wishes give me a lot of confidence. I am also a regular yoga practitioner and never attempt a race without a session of yoga pranayaama and meditation the day before the race.
Have you run at any international races? Which ones have been the most challenging?
The only international race I have done is SUNDOWN MARATHON at Singapore in May 2018. My son, who is now working in Singapore, had told me about this event and I was keen to participate as it was a night race. This was a flat track race and I took 5 hours and 14 minutes to complete the 42.195 km
What has been your most memorable race till date? Why?
It will definitely be the Malnad Ultra 2018 50 km. It was my maiden attempt in a trail setting and a wonderful place to do that feat.
With the racing season in full swing now in India, what is next on your race calendar?
I will be running the 42.195 km in the Skechers performance Chennai marathon on Jan 6th 2019. The next big race in the pipeline would be the Everest Ultra marathon on 29th May 2019

 

 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

 

An irregular runner who has run in dry, wet, high altitude and humid conditions. Loves to write a little more than run so now is the managing editor of Finisher Magazine.

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