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What began as ‘Fun’ turned to ‘Passion’

Deepthi Velkur talks to Shahana Zuberi who was inspired by a line she read once that said “If it doesn’t challenge you, it doesn’t change you”

Once considered an extreme sport for athletes, the marathon has become a popular phenomenon in the last decade. Without any limits of age and preparation, people gather from all over the world to run a marathon. The most important part of a race is to cross the finish line and that does not depend on how long one takes to complete the race. Shahana Zuberi a doctor in biology from LMU, Munich and a veteran marathoner couldn’t agree with this more.

Shahana took up running for fun 3 years ago and that quickly transformed into a passion. She started her journey as a runner by taking part in different long-distance races such as 10km races and half marathons. While juggling her time between taking care of her little son and managing a Multi Sports activity center for young enthusiasts between the age group 2.5 to 8 years, she never misses out on her own run.

She has taken part in several long-distance races – countless 10k’s and 4 half marathons which included Bangalore Marathon, Airtel Delhi Half Marathon, and Tata Mumbai Marathon. Her personal best timing at 10k was 66:24 mins and half marathon was 2 hours 33 mins. A veteran at the TCS world 10K, she has taken up the challenge to pace 80mins bus as a pacer for the first time. She is part of the 19 member women pacer squadron. This year her goal of being a pacer is to create high energy and motivation among the members of her bus by helping them achieve their best with strength and grace. She also feels running with a pacer is very helpful since the pacers are aware of the route well and strategize\plan the race according to the elevation which helps to keep up with the energy levels until the finish line.

I caught up with Shahana to understand what keeps her running.


How long have you been running?

I have been running regularly since last 3 years. I run at least thrice a week and on an average of 35-40 Km per week. I enjoy running and ensure I keep all my long runs, at the pace that it ends strongly. This keeps me motivated and always look forward to my next long run.

What do you find to be the most rewarding thing about running? Specifically running long distances?

Running long distance always gives me a sense of achievement. After running a certain distance, we go into a trance where nothing else matters except reaching the finish line. During the easy long runs, I plan my day and strategize on how I need to finish the race. This makes me well prepared for the run.

Have you calculated how many kms you have accumulated in all your years of running?

In the last two years, I have accumulated a total of 1500 kms.

Which was your most memorable run ever? What was your favorite part?

My best run was Spirit of Wipro, 2016. This was my first run after proper training and I performed better than expected considering it was a very tough terrain.

How do you prevent yourself from getting injured with all the running you do?

It is important to remain injury free to enjoy the runs. I ensure on doing a proper warm up and cool down after the runs. Stretching is very important after run workouts. Don’t go overboard with your running. I run only thrice a week and rest of the days I do strength training. Foam rolling is another way to keep your muscles relaxed.

Being a part of the first all-woman pacer squad in the TCS world 10k marathon, what was your goal?

My goal will be to get my bus on target time to the finish line and keep everyone motivated all through the race.  

How many times have you run the TCS marathon? What brings you to run this marathon every year?

TCS World 10k is a prestigious international event. People from all over India come for open 10K and many elite runners participate in this run. This will be my third time. It has a beautiful route running through the center of the city. It feels pretty much like a city tour.

You being a veteran marathon runner, what health\safety advice would you give a fresher?

Advice will be to start slow and train well. Take care of your food habits. It is important to eat nutritious food and involve strength workout in your training.

When it comes to training, what is your schedule like? How do you break down running and strength training in preparation for a marathon?

I run thrice a week and it comprises of interval runs, tempo and long distance running. The remaining part of the week, I do strength training and any light workout like walking, swimming or cycling.

What is your special diet plan before a run? Care to share a few tips?

Well, at least an hour before the run, you can eat bread and a peanut butter sandwich. I like to eat a banana. Few dates and handful of dry fruits are good too. One should include a lot of proteins and carbohydrate in their diet. A day before the race my standard food is Aloo paratha.

During a run, what do you think about? Are you thinking about the next km, your body, or something that’s inspiring you—what is that?

During the race, I only think about the finish line. But normally as I said before, during easy runs, my mind keeps working wherein I plan my day, work and lots of other thoughts keep racing through my head.

Have you seen yourself evolve over the years of running? How would you say you’ve grown as a runner?

Yes, I have definitely evolved a lot as a runner and also as a person. My pace has improved, able to strategize better before and during the run, there has been a boost in my endurance level due to running consistently. In my personal life, running has helped improve my overall patience and also lead a disciplined life.

Shahana leaves us with these inspiring words, “Keep pushing yourself harder with a never say die attitude and you will see success come your way.”

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

 

Deepthi Velkur is a former sprinter who is trying her hand at various sports today. A tennis fanatic, who believes that sleep should never be compromised.

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An Indian couple’s tryst with destiny…!

The Ironman Triathlon is widely touted as the toughest single-day endurance race in the world and is organized by the World Triathlon Corporation across the globe. The race begins with a 3.8km swim, 180km of cycling, followed by a marathon run of 42.2km. The race has to be completed in the very same order and within a time frame of 17 hours – a mammoth task only a few can successfully undertake.

Over the years, many Indians have taken part in the event including Dr. Kaustubh Radkar of Pune, who completed the race, a mind-boggling 16 times and now trains other aspirants. The race gained in popularity after model-actor Milind Soman accomplished the task of finishing the race in Zurich in 2015. Kaushik Mukherjee and Vineeta Singh, a couple from Powai, Maharashtra created history on July 2, 2017, when they became the first Indian couple to complete the grueling triathlon together.

Meet the couple

Kaushik and Vineeta, MBA graduates from IIM, Ahmedabad and parents to a 3-year-old son successfully run a five-year-old VC-funded beauty and personal care company. Vineeta, 33 years old has been an avid runner for the last decade and has completed the Comrades Ultra-marathon thrice from 2012-14. On the other hand, Kaushik, 35 had been a swimmer during his university days. After a lot of thought, the couple decided to meet halfway and contest triathlons, in order to combine both disciplines.

In order to train themselves for the Ironman challenge in Austria, they traveled across India participating in various races in Hyderabad, Chennai, Bengaluru, Delhi, and Goa.

Juggling Life

Trying to juggle their lives between being doting parents to their 3-year-old son, running a business and also training for the event of this scale was quite a herculean task. They could never train together and had to split their busy training schedules between early mornings and late evenings on most days to be with their son, so he never feels ignored. Also with the help of their supportive families, friends, and colleagues, they were able to dedicate time and focus on their training. Kaushik adds by saying “Both of us have always been fitness freaks and wanted to test ourselves. This Ironman was perfect in the sense that it was something we could do as a couple.”

Becoming Ironman

A few years ago, right after having their baby, the outdoorsy swimmer-runner couple found themselves lost in their daily routine of changing dirty diapers and sterilizing milk bottles. It was then that their lighthearted conversations around trying out the Ironman “someday” turned serious. After six months of training, which included rigorous planning, strict diet, 8-12 long hours of regular practice and 120km cycle rides on the Mumbai-Nashik highway on weekends, both set off to Austria to compete in the event and finished the race with excellent timings. While Vineeta completed the race in 16hrs 01min, Kaushik came in a 28 minutes later at 16hrs 29mins. According to them, the feeling was surreal when they touched the finishing line.

An important lesson they learned through this run was the importance of physical fitness in India is far less focused on when compared to that part of the world. Cycling and running long-distances was part of their daily routine. Age had no limit there felt Kaushik, as a 60-year-old man had comfortably overtaken them during the race which really inspired him.

A major element checked off their bucket list, the couple is looking forward to participating in the Ironman Triathlon again in the near future. “For now, our aim is to focus on our business and family in the next year or two. But after that, we will definitely do another Ironman in the future,” Kaushik said.

Kaushik and Vineeta’s journey shows us that it is possible to be physically fit and at the same time balance professional and personal lives. Here’s hoping their story inspires us to make fitness an important part of our daily life!

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Liam Malone ‘absolutely wrecked’ after completing Hawke’s Bay marathon challenge

Retired Paralympian Liam Malone is feeling “wrecked” after completing his first, and his last, marathon on his blades.

Malone completed the 42km Hawke’s Bay marathon in four hours and 47 minutes on Saturday morning, placing 256th out of 297 runners.

Better known for his skill in sprinting, the 24-year-old won the 400 and 200 metres in the T44 category at the Rio Olympics in 2016.

Read more at https://www.stuff.co.nz/sport/other-sports/103850424/liam-malone-completes-hawkes-bay-marathon-challenge

 

 

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Outlander star Sam joins Edinburgh Marathon runners

Outlander star Sam Heughan was among an estimated 35,000 runners who took to the roads in this weekend’s Edinburgh Marathon Festival.

The actor completed the marathon as part of a challenge to raise funds for male cancer awareness charity Cahonas Scotland.

Organisers said people from all over the world participated in Scotland’s biggest running festival.

Read more at http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-scotland-edinburgh-east-fife

 

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Ethiopian racers dominate at Ottawa Race Weekend marathon

Two Ethiopian athletes shined during Ottawa Race Weekend Sunday, finishing first in both the men’s and women’s categories in Canada’s largest marathon.

Yemane Tsegay, 33, won the Scotiabank Ottawa Marathon with a time of 2:08:52 Sunday.

Read more at http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa/ethiopian-athletes-win-ottawa-marathon

 

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Running for Good health

We explore how running can improve your health and also let you indulge in your passion for the outdoors, writes Nandini Reddy. 

Gyms are a great place for those looking to get in shape but they also come with a limitation of being indoors. Many people dislike being indoors and avoid going to gyms altogether. But if you still want to get healthy outdoors then running is the best option.

We have decided to explore 15 reasons that would motivate you to pick running as your go to way to stay healthy:

  1. Running burns 700-800 calories in an hour as per a study.
  2. Runners live longer than non-runners. This isn’t just an empty claim, there is a whole lot of research behind this. Apparently runners out live non-runners by 20%.
  3. If you live in the big city then running is one thing that you will not need to commute for. That is a big plus for those of you who hate commuting to the gym.
  4. Running releases happy hormones and gives you a high that is equivalent to cannabis as per a study published by Experimental Technology
  5. You get a lot of sun when you run. So you will never run of out of Vitamin D.
  6. You need minimal equipment to run – the most basic being a pair of shoes, shorts and a T-shirt.
  7. There is no restriction on timing, so you can choose to run whenever you want
  8. You can stick to your exercise routine even when you travel because running is an easy exercise to follow anywhere
  9. It gives your heart and lungs a good workout
  10. Its a high impact exercise that has amazing benefits on your bones
  11. You are less likely to fall sick with colds and coughs when you are a runner
  12. It is a very meditative form of exercise that gives you alone time to introspect. Don’t like being alone then its also a great way to socialize with other runners.
  13. Running always lifts your moods. If you are feeling dull or low then a run can always lift your mood.
  14. You have a variety of terrains to run – roads, trains, hills, forests, etc. It never gets boring.
  15. It doesn’t matter if you are an athlete or a newbie, you can always take up running

Whatever you reason just get out and run.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

 

An irregular runner who has run in dry, wet, high altitude and humid conditions. Loves to write a little more than run so now is the managing editor of Finisher Magazine.

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Empowering the Spirit of the Pacer

The all-women pacer group talks to Deepthi Velkur about what it takes to be leading runners at the TCSW10K.

If you are running the TCS World 10k this weekend in Bengaluru, then get ready to be lead by a formidable team of 19 women pacers. A first of its kind in the history of distance running, you will be following an accomplished group of runners as pacers this year. This unique initiative by Procam International for TCSW10K has raised the curiosity of running community and others alike. Vivek Singh, Jt. MD. Procam International says, “Running is empowering. The TCS World 10 K Bengaluru, is a showcase of the spirit of running. For the first time ever, we are delighted, to have an all-female pacer squad. Women from different walks of life are taking on leading roles, inspiring and helping amateur runners, to achieve their personal best.”

 

Each of the 19 pacers, wear multiple hats.  Mentor, motivator, and a role model in their own personal lives, they have the compassion and courage, to bring these qualities to the event. The fastest Bus is 50 mins and the final bus is at the 90 mins slot. So, depending on your running efficiency you can choose to follow any of the 19 pacers. The number 19 is not by accident but more by design. Experts at Procam analysed finish times across the last few editions and on the basis of feedback from amateur runners, KOL’s & running groups, identified the time slots that required more support and estimated improvement in finish times. This resulted in the different slots and the number of pacers that would be assisting runners on race day. Runners need to note that a Pacer BUS is the time at which a pacer will finish her race. All Runners aspiring to finish in that particular time target should follow her. For example, Shailja Sridhar is the 50 Mins Bus Pacer. All participants targeting a 50 mins finish time must join this bus.

Of the 19 pacers, 12 are from Bengaluru, 2 from Kolkata, 2 from Delhi, 2 from Mumbai & 1 from Chennai. Pacers were chosen based on the following criteria

  • Performance in last 12 months in training prior to Race day
  • Average weekly mileage of last 52 weeks, best performance in last 6 months
  • Margin of comfort needed between personal best & bus time
  • Lastly pacers own confidence to bring the bus in ‘ON TIME’

Catching up with a few pacers, we learnt about their thoughts about running, pacing and being part of the all-women pacer group.

How it started

Bindu Juneja, the 60 min BUS, speaks about how the idea germinated, “It was Jayanti Poojari’s dream to have a team of all Women Pacers for the 1st time in the World. I’m very proud to be part of this team.” Adding to this Shikha Rawal, 65 min BUS, says, “I think it is a brilliant idea and all credits to Procam for this. I am proud to be part of the squadron of 19. I couldn’t believe when I first got approached by Procam and I said yes immediately.”

“I have been running the TCS for the last 5yrs. This will be my 6th year. I am a regular runner and I know a lot of people who run, so a friend of mine recommended my name to Procam. They checked my track record and selected me as a pacer. It was Jayanti’s brain child to have come up with this idea. She felt it was something very different and its empowering women to come out and do something unique. Seasoned runners from across the country will be taking part in this run,” adds Sangamitra Guha, 70 mins BUS.

Responsibility of the pacer

Being a pacer is a responsibility that cannot be taken lightly. Shahana Zaberi, 80 min BUS, takes her job as a pacer very seriously. She notes, “Being a Pacer is a very responsible job. We need to get our Bus on time. Irrespective of any odds happen during the route, we must cross the finish line on our target pacing time. Running slow or faster than our pace time will fail the whole purpose of pacer. We must follow the consistent pace and make the strategy well, depending on elevation profiles or other factors during the race.”

The group has a mix of experienced and new pacers but their commitment to pacing is unquestionable. Anjana Mohan, 70 mins BUS, echoes these thoughts, “The window is narrow – 30 seconds on either side of a promised time slot. Timing splits are also key, so a pacer cannot simply run haphazardly and then drag things out or speed things up in the last few yards or even kilometers. There are timing mats throughout the course and the steadiness of the pacer is quantified.”

Why follow a Pacer?

If you are wondering why we need to run with a pacer, then Neelam Talwar (80 mins BUS) an experienced pacer who has paced the Airtel Delhi Half Marathon 2017 and Tata Mumbai Marathon 2018, answers that question, “Running a distance race with a Pacer helps you to focus exclusively on your running without having to spend any mental energy on the pace. A runner just needs to keep an eye on the Pacer, focus on the running. The Pacer motivates the runner, keeps the runner updated on the hydration stops on the route. Running with a Pacer helps think positively and not make an excuse of the weather, fatigue or just turn away from the target.”

Bahar Sinha, 55 min BUS, also adds, “With the pacer you don’t need to have any strategy, just follow the pacer and try to just align yourself with the pacer. When you are running alone then you need to plan and act on your own. Sometimes a mere thought that someone is there for you makes your journey smooth and that’s what pacer are there for!”

Nandini Ashokumar, 85 mins BUS, is a 6 time pacer who has assisted runners in the previous edition of the TCSW10K. She stresses, “Pacer helps the runner to stay on track by maintaining a specific time per km, motivates the runner, shares valuable running tips and stays focused to help the runners in the Bus achieve their dream target. For a beginner, running with a pacer will be of great help and for experienced it would help them achieve their personal best.”

What excites the Pacers about running?

An excited Mahalakshmi Sagar, 60 min BUS, says, “The exciting part of running is with every run you discover a new thing about your body in terms of strength and weakness, and it does surprise you. The greatest lesson running has taught me is “You are stronger than you think”. Also it keeps me fit and has got me so many friends. Catching up with runner friends for a chatty run is my favourite.”

“That I run in the open during the wee hours when it is dawning and that I get to breathe the fresh morning air. Clichéd but true – it completely de-stresses me and makes me positive and have an optimistic outlook towards everything,” says Kavitha Nair, 75 mins BUS.

Avani Vora, 55 mins BUS recalls, “I have been running for almost 8 years now. Although running is something I do as I enjoy it. I feel I can connect to myself while I run, it helps is killing all negative energy within and makes me a better human being mentally and physically I stay fit, am able to look after my kids, husband, parents and friends.”

 Advice to runners from Pacers

“Do not kill yourself following a pacer. Select a pacer who is a little slower than what you want to achieve and if you feel up to it, you can go ahead. Better to go ahead of a pacer rather than lag behind. Choose wisely,” is the sincere advice from Anu Beri, 85 mins BUS.

The fastest pacer, Shailja Sridhar, 50 min BUS, says, “A good pacer will hopefully be helpful at the start and set the pace but it’s good to listen to your body. It’s also good to remember that the pacer is also human and can make mistakes.” Ranjani Ramanujam gives the final word, “Trust the pacers, and stay with them through the 10K.”

For these pacers running is a part of them. It’s a form of meditation for them and the honour of being a pacer is never taken lightly by them. Praising the commitment of the pacers, Vivek Singh adds, “Pacing amateurs is a selfless and challenging task. However, I am confident that at the end of the race, each one of these pacers will feel a sense of accomplishment, that goes beyond the sacrifice of achieving one’s personal best.”

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

 

Deepthi Velkur is a former sprinter who is trying her hand at various sports today. A tennis fanatic, who believes that sleep should never be compromised.

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Ensure Adequate Fuelling

Shiny Surendran, the city’s leading sports nutritionist, talks to Radhika Meganathan about what is important for runners to ensure adequate fuelling.

Shiny Surendran wears many hats. Not only is she a certified nutritionist and a published author, she also is the first Indian to be awarded Graduate Diploma in Sports Nutrition from International Olympic Committee, possesses a masters in food service management and is the Chairperson of the Website team of Indian Dietetic Association. Today, she speaks to The Finisher Mag about the kind of foods to eat and avoid when it comes to running

In your opinion, how does an avid runner err in terms of nutrition and eating habits?

I have often noticed that a group which runs together usually has a team breakfast post run. Sometimes with all the group energy, they might eat more than they have expended during the run! Portion control is a good thing to keep in mind if you’d like to maintain your peak running stats.

Some runners overeat carbs and not include enough protein. Another point to ponder is not getting adequate Magnesium and Omega 3 fats. These mistakes can be easily rectified by mindful awareness about nutrition, and more effectively, by consulting a nutritionist who will analyse your body type, health stats and suggest the best diet for you.

What is your recommended power foods for pre or post run?

A fruit milkshake such as apple / banana milkshake (use almond milk if you are lactose intolerant) is great for pre workout / post workout drink. For pre-/post-run meal, keep to complex carbs such as oats or Multi grain porridge mix, with fruits and/or nuts in it. Since most of our climate is tropical, watermelon and pomegranate juice are good for anti oxidants, aids recovery with phyto nutrients. And then there is the affordable and nature’s bounty coconut water which is excellent for hydration plus electrolytes.

What kind of food is best avoided by runners?

I’d have to say, fibre rich foods, raw salads, and sprout salad, especially before a run. Runners should also avoid legumes like peanuts, rajma, white channa, gas producing foods like cabbage. As a general nutritional guideline, athletes are recommended to avoid white sugar, maida, food with artificial colors and flavours. And I recommend avoiding fruit juice, ice cubes made from tap water, raw chutneys or raw salads if you are in a new city for a run. Chances of food poisoning or gastric infection is very high, so be on guard!

What is good for recovery nutrition?

Hydration is very important to replace the salts lost and vital for recovery. I advise runners to drink at least 1 litre of sport drink after the run, especially if you live in a city which is hot and humid. In case you have high sweat loss, it is a good idea to include pickle, papad, and salty seafood dishes which have high levels of sodium.

Recent opinion is that low carb diets like paleo or keto are harmful for runners, since runners need carbs for fueling. Is this true? 

A former colleague and a fitness professional would eat a full south Indian meal 2 hours and run very well at long distance events. Somehow when he implemented the sport nutrition principles of eating 4 hours before the run, did not work well for him. The fullness / satiety helped him run well. He defied all principles of sport nutrition!

The reason I am mentioning this here is to stress that we are not all cut from the same cloth. Body types and their response to carbohydrate rich food are different. Our body has large amounts of fat which could be tapped for energy. People who are insulin sensitive can eat carbs in moderation but the ones with insulin resistance will benefit from Low Carb High Fat (LCHF) diets. This will have NO adverse affect on their running efficacy.

You mean, runners do not need carbs at all?

As I always say, everything in moderation. My stance is that carbs are not indispensable, nor is it a bad word. Do consult a certified nutritionist before changing your diet or training, and find out what kind of body type you have. People have varying levels of insulin resistance – the ones who really struggle to lose weight in spite of eating healthy complex carbs and good dose of protein and fibre – they will benefit a lot from LCHF diets. During off season they could try LCHF until they reach ideal weight and then before competition training, they can reload carbs moderately.

 Did you notice anything interesting while training runners or athletes? 

While working in YMCA sports medicine department, I observed physical education students drinking aerated drinks with glucose added to it for that extra boost of energy. Little did they realise, they would have sugar levels crashing after 20-30 minutes. I of course told them to avoid this type of stimulating drinks.

A recreational runner that I knew got severe stomach pain while running. She experimented and found better results with electrol than the commercial sports drinks. My brother’s friend would consume fermented rice mixed with buttermilk every morning and run marvelously well. He was the best runner in school. Simple carbs worked well for him. One needs to experiment to find what suits their body types.

 Can you give some nutrition tips for our runner readers?

  • My first tip would be to eat real food. Not the one that comes in plastic or dripping in additives/sauces, but the food that is closer to what has been made in your home for years. Freshly made, with local ingredients and love and care.
  • Experiment during non-competition days. Figure out what works to optimize your running. Create a template of foods that enhances your running. Stick to it.
  • Pure vegetarians (lacto vegetarians) should consider whey or plant protein options to pep up recovery and build muscle mass
  • Calcium, Magnesium, Iron and B complex, Omega 3 fats are very important. Eat lots of red- and green-coloured locally available greens, such as radish and turnip greens, agathi keerai, drumstick leaves (moringa leaves), spinach, manathakkali, etc which are all excellent source of Magnesium, calcium and iron. Especially if you are a vegetarian who does not eat much vegetables (sadly this is more common than you’d think, many vegetarians consume a lot of carbs at the expense of vegetables) you MUST pay attention to your daily meal plan.

Balance is the key. You don’t have to deny yourself your favorite stuff, just make sure you enjoy all foods in moderation. Do not ape latest trends!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

 

Radhika Meganathan is a published author who is an advocate for healthy living, she practices sugar-free intermittent fasting, all-terrain rambling and weight training.

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How to Prevent Chafing

Radhika Meganathan finds out the hard way that you need to be prepared ahead to deal with chafed skin resulting from running.

Spring in Central Park is magical. Flowers are in full bloom, the air is mild and fresh, and the winding pathways along pretty fountains and interesting landscaping offer the best running experience for novice and experienced alike. And there I was, happily jogging at my own pace when the climate suddenly changes – the sun shone with all its might and the day turned sultry. Oops!

But no problem, I am in New York and I am not going to allow a hot day – bah! I am a Chennaite and I am no stranger to the heat! – to deter me from my afternoon run. So I proceeded, until I became slowly aware of a burning in the area where my inner thighs made contact. In less than half an hour, I was in agony and unable to even step one foot forward. The pain was worse than a toothache!

I had no other choice but to collapse on the grass, and even after resting for an hour, the pain didn’t alleviate. Finally, I had to wobble like a duck to the nearest exit (each step was like walking on burning embers) and hail a taxi to the nearest pharmacy.  All in all, a very costly lesson in Preventing Chafing 101!

What is Chafing?

Repetitive contact between skin and skin, or skin and clothing, can cause painful chafing, which, if untreated, can become an open wound. It’s common for runners to experience chafing on the armpits, groin area or inner thighs, since those body parts create friction when running. You can be especially prone to chafing on a hot and humid day, but really, chafing can occur any time. If your skin is already chafed, here’s what to do:

  1. If you are outside and in agony because of your chafed skin, leave immediately. Do not keep running or walking.
  2. If you are not able to leave immediately, your best bet is to borrow or buy coconut oil or Vaseline and smear it on the offending areas. The idea is to stop the dry chafing, which is the reason behind all the pain. By introducing a lubricant like an oil or Vaseline, you will be able to experience temporary relief until you get home, or make it to the pharmacy.
  3. At the pharmacy, you can opt for a number of remedies, such as anti-chafing ointments. Remember, you need a cooling salve to soothe the burning skin, so clearly ask for the right product for your chafing.
  4. If your chafed skin is inflamed on the verge of breaking out, choose a salve with antibacterial properties. Even diaper rash cream works wonders.
  5. In case the chafed skin is throbbing or bloody, seek medical attention as soon as possible.

Preventing chafing

Prevention is always better than cure, so here are some preventive measures to avoid chafing:

  1. Wear clothing that allows optimum movement, lets your skin breathe and absorbs extra moisture. Lycra, Spandex and polyester material do the trick.
  2. Wear compression shorts under your running outfit. Before putting on your shorts, apply a layer of baby powder on your inner thighs and groin. This will prevent friction when you run.
  3. Hydrate. Drinking a lot of water keeps the salt concentration in your sweat minimum. Why is this good news? Because salt irritates skin, especially chafed skin.
  4. Never do a long walk or run in a skirt, especially in hot weather. Naked skin creates the quickest and most painful chafing.
  5. Always carry a small tub of Vaseline whenever you run. You will be glad you did!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

 

Radhika Meganathan is a published author who is an advocate for healthy living, she practices sugar-free intermittent fasting, all-terrain rambling and weight training

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