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Kenya’s Eliud Kipchoge wins London Marathon

Eliud Kipchoge stormed to his third London Marathon title on Sunday to complete an impressive Kenyan double after Vivian Cheruiyot dominated the women’s race in warm conditions.
Kipchoge, 33, saw off the challenge of Ethiopia’s Tola Shura Kitata and home favorite Mo Farah to win his third London marathon in four years in a time of 2 hrs 4 min 27 sec, finishing more than half a minute in front of Kitata (2:05:00), with Farah third (2:06:32).
Cheruiyot, 34, timed her run perfectly to win the women’s event in a time of 2 hours 18 min 31 secs ahead of compatriot Brigid Kosgei (2:20:13), and Ethiopia’s Tadelech Bekele (2:21:40).

Read more at http://www.arabnews.com/node/1289311/sport

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‘Even Sir Mo Farah struggled’

This year’s London Marathon runners battled sweltering conditions as the race recorded its hottest ever temperatures.

Here, Sky News correspondent Enda Brady describes the physical toll of the event which once dealt him “the worst physical experience” of his life.

Running any marathon is a massive test of endurance but when it gets as hot as it did in London on Sunday, the physical challenge simply becomes immense.

After months of training during the winter, runners were confronted with record temperatures and many were left cursing the weather gods for their terrible timing.

Read more at https://news.sky.com/story/even-sir-mo-farah-struggled-the-immense-challenge-of-this-years-london-marathon-11343942

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Madison de Rozario wins women’s wheelchair event in high temperatures

Fresh from her Commonwealth Games triumph, Australia’s Madison De Rozario has taken out the women’s elite wheelchair event at the London Marathon.

Her compatriot Kurt Fearnley came fifth in the men’s event, following a thrilling three-way dash for first that saw England’s David Weir storm to an eighth victory.

“I feel very surprised still, it’s unreal, that was amazing,” said De Rozario, who won T54 Commonwealth Games gold just over a week ago.

“Just physically doing the 42km felt a lot easier after last weekend and knowing that my body is happy to do it.

Know more at http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-04-23/madison-de-rozario-wins-london-marathon-wheelchair/9686470

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Gold Rules

The Common Wealth Games 2018 saw Indian athletes demonstrate some stupendous performance, Capt Seshadri rounds up the glorious performance.

Much gold was struck Down Under, at the Gold Coast… not by prospectors, but by sportspersons. Australia’s major tourist destination, with its welcoming sub-tropical climate, pristine beaches, rainforests and its contrasting theme parks and nightlife, played host less than a fortnight ago, to the Commonwealth Games 2018, with the continent being the venue for the fifth time in the Games’ history.

The History

Just over a century ago, to commemorate the coronation of King George V, a ‘Festival of the Empire’ was held in London. As part of the celebrations, an inter-empire championship was held in athletics, swimming, boxing and wrestling, with teams from the host nation, Canada, South Africa and Australia participating. This then, was probably the first Commonwealth Games, although the term was yet to be coined as the Commonwealth was a non-existent commodity; hence, they were dubbed the British Empire Games. Somewhere along the line, it was decided to hold them once every four years, in tune with the Olympics.

In typical British tradition, there are set rituals for the Games. One such is the Queen’s Baton Relay, somewhat akin to the Olympic Torch. The Baton starts its journey from Buckingham Palace, bearing a message from the Head of the Royal family, now Queen Elizabeth II. At the opening ceremony, the final bearer hands it back to the Queen, or her representative, who reads the message aloud to officially declare the Games open. Today, 71 teams participate in the Games, although there are only 53 registered members under the Commonwealth of Nations; as in the Olympics, the remaining take part under their own flags.

The 2018 Games

At the 2018 Games, over 4,400 sportspersons competed over 12 days in 19 events spread across venues in 14 centres in the city and 3 outside, for a total of 275 sets of medals. Unique to these Games are a few sports that are not part of the Olympic calendar, like net ball, lawn bowling and squash. With the introduction of athletes with disabilities for the first time in the 1994 Games in Victoria, British Columbia, and the signing of a formal agreement in 2007 in Colombo, between the Commonwealth Games Federation and the International Paralympic Committee, the Commonwealth Games made history as the first international competitive event to become fully inclusive. And the results of the para-athletic events are part of the overall medal tally. The 2018 Games also achieved a new distinction by becoming the first major international multi-sporting event to achieve gender equality, with an equal number of events for both men and women.

The Games had their share of ignominy too. Athletes from a few African countries like Sierra Leone, Uganda, Cameroon and Rwanda, disappeared from the Games village, apparently abandoning their world class sporting talent and fame, seeking a future and fortune in Australia. Ironic that this ‘seeking after fortune’ should be in the ‘Gold’ Coast. And as did their wards, so did a few coaches and officials disappear too!

India had a fairly satisfactory outing at the Games. Placed third overall behind host Australia and the United Kingdom, our country finished with a tally of 66 medals, comprising 26 gold, 20 silver and 20 bronze. Many of the medallists are household names in India – Mary Kom at age 35, beating rivals a decade and a half younger to win gold, shuttler Srikanth Kidambi rising to the rank of world number one and our women and men achieving sporting glory in individual and team events.

So, it seems, in the week of Akshaya Tritiya, when gold brought home is said to bring more fortune, our Indian team has done remarkably well. If this belief translates into reality, one could surely expect a much larger tally of medals in 2022!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

 

Capt Seshadri Sreenivasan is a former armed forces officer with over 30 years experience in marketing. He also a consulting editor with a leading publishing house. He is a co-author of the best selling biography of astronaut Sunita Williams.

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The hottest London Marathon

Nandini Reddy takes a look at one of the most anticipated marathon’s in the world, the Virgin London Marathon 2018.

Whenever we think London Marathon we think rain, but this year the rains decided to visit Boston and the sun will be out in full force this Sunday for the 38th Virgin London Marathon 2018. While that has become the talking point of the marathon this year the marathon is attracting its share of elite runners and celebrities. The marathon is also famous for the number of runners who turn up in the zaniest of costumes.

Here are a few things you need to remember when you run the famed London Marathon this year

  • There will always be a queue for toilets so be prepared
  • Find your place in the starting corrals because it will take at least a mile before its free running as the crowd spreads out
  • You will be running with gorillas and Batman, so get ready to have them whiz past you
  • If you like seeing the sights then you can look out for The Big Ben, Isle of Dogs, Canary Wharf and Surrey Quays to name a few
  • Crowds will cheer you on through the way; absorb that energy
  • Don’t be too surprised if you hear someone yell you name, its on your BIB and people are just calling out encouragements
  • As you near the finish line, the crowds will get louder and more boisterous. It can be annoying or encouraging, depending on how you view it

The Heat

Weathermen are saying that the temperate is expected to spike to 24C. Thus far the record of high temperature has been 22C. This unreasonably warm weather might play spoilsport for all the runners who want to run in costume. For the regular runner, remember to dress wisely. Also not over exerting themselves keeping in mind the warm weather would be a good idea. While there is an expected short spell of rain, experts feel that this will slow the race down because it might make the running surface slick.

The Elites

More than 40,000 people will be lining up to run the London Marathon this year. Among the elites, we have Sir Mo Farah back in action this year and is looking to best his time of 2:08:21 that he set in 2014. Last year’s winner Daniel Wanjiru might not be deterred by the temperatures and will be looking to repeat last year’s success. The Kenyan, Mary Keitany is back again to defend her title against fierce competition from Ethiopian runner Tirnuesh Dibaba who lost out by mere seconds in 2017. Gladys Cherono, a fan favourite at the Berlin Marathon will be running the London Marathon for the first time this year.

Running for a Cause

Like all big marathons, London attracts a host of people supporting causes. The big charities have a host of celebrities running for them. But there are many interesting smaller stories like a Norfolk teacher running to raise funds for a hospital that saved her son and the father running a bear costume to raise funds for his daughter’s treatment. The most exciting one that many will be watching for is Simon Kindleyside, who will be running his first London Marathon with an exo-skeleton suit instead of a wheelchair. Simon is determined to complete the course, so that he can show that being paralysed shouldn’t stop anyone from achieving their marathon dreams.

There might be changes in personal best timings if the heat becomes too unbearable but if runners remember to hydrate and aim finish the course, they should be better off.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

 

An irregular runner who has run in dry, wet, high altitude and humid conditions. Loves to write a little more than run so now is the managing editor of Finisher Magazine.

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Too Much Too Soon

Our Guest Columnist, Tarun Walecha, shares his thoughts on staying injury free.

Running is the new golf as they say, and it certainly is as it has reached the corridors of corporate power today. But not before having made its impact on society, in general. The reason to this is simple, running isn’t all about power, or networking. It is far more than that, it touches you in many ways, be that your lifestyle, your ability to analyse and understand day to day situation, self-discipline, strong will and much more…so much more. One of the prime benefits which we start it all with, our fitness, that later becomes just a collateral. I’m carefully using the word collateral which by no measure means insignificant. There’s still more that running brings into ones life, new friends for one (and hoard of them, actually), lot’s running gear(mostly free 😊), a bit of travel for the events, not to miss the adulation (PBs et al) and the least preferred of them all….Injuries.

Is it all too much too soon?

Well, there can be a write up on each one of the issues, but we shall focus on injuries this time. Most of us who start running do not have a great history of sports. Well I said most, cause most often those with some sports background also fall in this category as they restart this regime after a fair amount of downtime. Those who restart this journey after a gap in the sporting activities, and for someone to start altogether fresh, running does expose us to certain amount of risk of injuries. Having said that, I can very confidently say that it’s not running that is the cause of the injuries though it does become the medium. It is like blaming a car for an accident and absolving or ignoring the role of the one who drives it. Let us understand what’s the reason for the injuries….and let’s understand when is it too much, too soon.

Roadblocks we encounter

One starts running with an aim of staying fit, and the limited available knowledge is a natural course of things to unfold. As we chart this journey, we encounter various roadblocks, inability to improve the speed, or cover longer distance, lack of disciplined routine and of course, a schedule to follow. While we seek these answers through various friends, runners, running coaches, online portals etc what we also start learning about is PBs, Podium finishes, and everything else that comes with it.  This is exactly where the “Too much Too soon” syndrome sets in. What started as a hobby, breaks through the realm of passion and before we realise it becomes an obsession. Suddenly learning takes a back seat, improving becomes the main criteria! Running for fitness seems basic, and getting a podium finish becomes the main driver. It’s this shift of focus that makes us ignore our limitations and push beyond the boundaries. Having said that what is life within the confines of limitations, and who would get better if one does not push the boundaries. But there’s a thin line there, a very thin line which only we can define for ourselves.

Misjudging your boundaries

There will always be a friend egging you to run faster, or a coach pushing you for a stiff target, and at times even a runner who silently is clocking better time than you but becomes the cynosure of your eyes and all you wanna do is get ahead of him/her. In a situation like this, more often than not, we misjudge ourselves, our training, our strength and our weakness. And even when we maintain our sanity, running as a regime does have its own wear and tear on our body. Our muscles are going to tire, our mind and body is going to get fatigued. But let’s not forget, no two individuals can be alike and this is a scientific fact. What we deal with is something similar, but beyond the biological or physical sphere. With a given physical and biological background, an individual still have too many variables to deal with, such as, a day job, daily routine, personal stress, amount of rest, one’s own willingness, mental strength and the list goes on. What we need to understand is that each one of these variables has a role to play for the way we perform. So, before we begin to compete with someone, we need to look within and know what’s good for us. It is this ignorance which leads to pushing the boundaries beyond the realm of reality and becomes the main reason for injuries.

Lessons Learnt

I started running about 8 years back with hardly any friends in running and bare minimum social media exposure. I consider this a blessing in disguise, cause the learning came in slow, but that slow did good to me. I won’t say I didn’t have my tryst with injuries, it’s a given as all the pounding is bound to show up some way or the other. Fortunately for me it has just been stress accumulation, incorrect or over training which lead to what one may define as pre-injury state. Each time it left a lesson behind, a sign to know if it was too much for me.

What we all need to understand is how to deal with it, but before that we must know, when to push further and when to back out. Only when you dive into a deep sea you will get pearls but where to dive and how to dive is the key. Of course, there’s a recourse through medical intervention, physiotherapy, proper guidance, etc. if one does fall into the trap or gets injured, but those we can deal in another article at another time. For now if I was to sum up my intent for this blog, I would say the following.

  1. Know your limits, make incremental changes and remember how Rome was built…😊.
  2. Understand your strength, and seek guidance when needed.
  3. Push your boundaries, but don’t be over ambitious.
  4. It’s important to understand your muscular anatomy and what it takes to run.
  5. Learn it the right way, correct form is the key to injury free and efficient running.
  6. Last but not the least, You are your own competitor, no one else.

Don’t let someone else becomes your bench mark… an inspiration, yes… a competitor, no. Learn to do this for yourself and not for others, let’s not fall in the trap and succumb to “Too Much Too Soon”.

GUEST COLUMNIST 

An architect by profession, Tarun Walecha enjoys amateur photography, travelling and is a sports enthusiast. He has been a sportsperson all his life and discovered running at the age of 40 and has since become his fitness mantra. In his 7 year running career he has completed 30 Half Marathons, 4 Full Marathon, and 5 Trail/Ultra Runs. He is also a Pinkathon ambassador and has founded the running group, RunXtreme.

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Summer Running

As the temperature rises, its important for runners to learn to stay cool so that they can keep running during the hot summer months, writes Nandini Reddy.

Summer is a great time to run but it can also be a huge challenge. Sweating and hydration are the key factors most runners need to watch out for. Dehydration is a danger that runners in tropical climates need to watch out for. Walking in the sun might seem like a challenge if you live in coastal cities because the humidity spikes during the summer months. But if you do want to keep running and not loose your running grove then here are a few tips to help you run during summer.

Water, Water and more Water

You have to up your fluid intake during the summer months. You need to hydrate before you run, carry a bottle while you run and then hydrate again after you finish your run. The sweating might need you to replenish your body with electrolytes post the run. If you don’t like carrying water bottles then you can chart a circuitous route and keep a couple of bottles at different points.

Early mornings are best

This is the coolest time during summer. Even the evenings can be stuffy so the morning is the best time to run. Since the sun rises early, becoming a morning runner will not interfere with the rest of your day. You can also enjoy the outdoors without having to fight off the ill effects of heat.

Run in the shade

If you can find a path that is shaded with trees or near a water source, it would make for a great running course as a trail will be less hotter. If you can avoid running on a road you should because asphalt heats up fast. Find a park or a trail, or if you live near a beach then its the best place to run.

Wear thinner clothes

Cotton might seem better for the summer, but it won’t help while you run. Breathable synthetic athletic wear is a better choice to keep you cool while you run. Choose light colours and not dark ones that will absorb more heat. Reflective colours are the best as they will keep you cooler.

Cool Down well

After you finish you run, try to cool down with water and ice. You can also consider cooling your body before you start the run because it will help you improve your running performance. If you cool down before you run during summer, it takes longer for your core temperature to rise and thus helps in improving your running performance.

Sunscreen & Hats

Remember to wear hats and put on the sunscreen because it won’t make much sense to enjoy a run and not worry about sun damage. You can burnt if you are not careful and if you cover your head, you will feel less fatigued. Use visor hats that are made from breathable mesh rather than skull caps that will make you feel hotter.

You do not have to stay indoors just because its summer. If you choose the right time, right gear and drink water, summer can be a very enjoyable month for running.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

 

An irregular runner who has run in dry, wet, high altitude and humid conditions. Loves to write a little more than run so now is the managing editor of Finisher Magazine.

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Chicago’s Elite Wheelchair Athlete Wins Race in 2018 Boston Marathon

The most decorated champion in Chicago Marathon history has now won the women’s wheelchair race for the fifth time at the 2018 Boston Marathon—pushing through puddles that sent the spray from her wheels into her eyes.

Monday marked Tatyana McFadden’s 22nd majors win, the most of any female wheelchair athlete. Her unofficial finishing time was 2:04:39, the slowest in 30 years.

The Paralympian and World Championship gold medalist is considered an elite wheelchair athlete in Chicago.

Read more : https://www.nbcchicago.com/news/local/chicagos-elite-wheelchair-athlete-wins-race-in-2018-boston-marathon–479907263.html

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The 2018 Boston Marathon: By The Numbers

American Desiree Linden became the first American woman to win the Boston Marathon since 1985 with a time of 2:39:54. Japan’s Yuki Kawauchi won his country’s first title in the men’s division since 1987 with a time of 2:15:58.

The 122nd annual Boston Marathon takes place Monday on Patriots’ Day, which is a state holiday in Massachusetts and commemorates the Battles of Lexington and Concord. Patriots’ Day typically includes an early 11:05 start for the Boston Red Sox so fans can watch runners pass Fenway Park, but the annual Sox game was canceled due to inclement weather for the first time since 1984.

Read more at https://www.forbes.com/sites/kurtbadenhausen/2018/04/16/the-boston-marathon-2018-by-the-numbers/#1edf75fe31d6

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