Training Comments (0) |

Goal Setting and Mental Preparation for New Runners

Are you a debut marathoner? Your success is mostly determined by two crucial factors, says Radhika Meganathan, to set you up for your first marathon

In a research conducted by Staffordshire University (UK) on 700 ultra-marathoners, study results revealed that mental strength accounted for 14% of their success rate. It’s a fairly huge percentage to depend on to get you through the last few miles. Fortunately, the mind can be trained just like the body. however, as the mind is not a muscle, you need to employ a different technique to help it understand and embrace a debut marathon running training.

PREPARING YOUR GOALS
If you are excited about running your first marathon, consider setting ‘SMART‘ goals:
Specific – Rather attempting to win, aim to complete a 2 km run within 15 minutes by the end of this month.
Measurable – Use apps and equipment like stopwatch or a GPS unit to measure your progress.
Achievable – Instead of, say, a tough trail run, start with your local half marathon and take it from there. You don’t want to burn out too early.
Realistic – Both sport and endurance need realistic time to develop and excel. Have sensible goals like improving your running time by minutes,
Time – Set a proper time limit for your goals. ‘When I do this marathon, my running time must have improved by 10 minutes’ is a great time goal.

PREPARING YOUR MIND
As Ken Larscheid, owner of Running Lab quotes in Detroit Free Press, the race doesn’t really start until the last two miles, and that is when the mental strength comes into play. Here are some tips to get your mind revved for the race ahead:

1. Get your inner dialogue right: The voice inside our head determines our determination in holding on till the end. For a debut runner, this means being positive not just on race day, but throughout the training period.

2. Address your fears: Fear is good, because it cautions you in advance. If you are scared about anything, just air it out with your trainer. Talk to experienced marathoners and get their insider tips on what their most concerns were and how they tackled them.

3. Familiarise with The Wall: Most fear the wall or “bonking”, with good reason. Your training will give you the confidence and ability to face any bad patch, so just make sure you are pro-active in addressing all possible slip ups that can occur during a debut marathon run.

4. Have your own ritual: Try developing your own ‘mantra’, i.e., finding your unique way to block your mind against a negative mood – a special song, or use counting, just anything, really, to pull your focus away from bad thoughts.

5. Be in the present: You need to be in the present to train well, because only stress lives in the future and you want to avoid that. When you focus on the now. Winning is about performance, not destination, so train in the present, because that’s the only thing that is in your control.

Remember, if this is your first marathon, just finishing it from start to end is a worthy goal by itself. For now, concentrate on building your experience and endurance, and your speed and techniques will automatically improve over the course of time.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR 

 

A published author and an avid rambler, Radhika Meganathan is a recent keto convert who may or may not be having a complicated relationship with bacon and butter.

Read more

Events Comments (0) |

Along the Spice Coast

Ramesh Kartha, the race director of the Spice Coast Marathon talks about the just concluded race this year. 

In the land of endless greenery, a special marathon that meanders through the streets of Kochi through all the historical locations of the Muziris. Ramesh Kartha, Boston Marathon Finisher and race director shares his thoughts about the race.

There is a unique feature about the Spice Coast Marathon, where you have designed it to pass 42 monuments, how did this idea come about?
The idea of 42km with 42 landmarks came about while thinking of a unique way to bring our race to runners. Kochi has a rich heritage of many hundreds of years. There are artifacts of many cultures that can be seen all over this place within a small geographical area. That’s why we thought of the idea of a “running tourist” who might get a different perspective of both Kochi and running while doing it.

The Spice Coast Marathon has also gained fame for being a Boston qualifier, but this year with a change in course the runners didn’t get the opportunity to qualify? What changed?
We had two strong reasons for recommending a course change this year. We had some bad patches in the previous courses with respecting lighting and road conditions. We also have Kochi Municipal Corporation as our active partner this year and they preferred the race being conducted more towards the city to engage more people and sights.

The race also is one of the few without prize money so do you attract elite runners despite this?
Since we do not have any prize money for our event, we hardly see any “elite” runners in the conventional sense. However, we would like to think of every runner as an elite, hence we welcome runners of all ages and abilities.While many of our local runners are repeat participants for obvious reasons, we also have loyal supporters from outside Kerala and abroad who have participated in every edition.

What best course timing did you see this year?
The full marathon saw the best time of 3:14 hrs and the half marathon had a best time of 1:16 hrs which are very impressive.

Why should this race be on every runner’s yearly running schedule?
This is purely a runner’s event. We celebrate road running in its purest form. You can see the passionate team from Soles of Cochin doing everything we can to make this a long-cherished experience for every runner. The volunteers are excellent, the cheering zones by the Depart of Tourism are enthralling and the sights of the historic Kochi are breathtaking and of course, the medal 🙂

As a Boston Finisher yourself, how challenging is the Spice Coast in comparison?
Spice Coast course is challenging due to the location it’s in – the humid Kochi. While November weather in Kochi is reasonably cool, the humidity can still be high and challenging. The course is quite flat, so it can be fast if the weather cooperates.

Lessons from this year that you would like the share.
Our biggest single-most challenge this year was the course finalization that got dragged into the final week with all discussions and approvals with the authorities. We plan to start the process early next year, even though a possibility of any last minute changes can’t be ruled out. Overall, the feedback we received about the event this year has been mainly positive.

For every passionate runner the Spice Coast Marathon is a must finish at least once in a lifetime. But once you run it, you just might come back every year.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR 

 

An irregular runner who has run in dry, wet, high altitude and humid conditions. Loves to write a little more than run so now is the managing editor of Finisher Magazine.

 

Read more

News Comments (0) |

Which is India’s favourite city among runners – Mumbai, Delhi, Chennai or Bengaluru?

Running as a sport has caught on in a big way in Indian cities with the creation of runners’ groups, sharing of resources and at least one eponymous race hosted by every big city. Now, with the temperatures having dropped in most parts of the country, running fever is at a high.

 Bengaluru just hosted the 10K intencity run and earlier in November, the Airtel Delhi Half Marathon saw a great response despite the initial uncertainty caused by the alarming levels of pollution in the capital region. In an earlier article, we discussed how air quality, though traditionally not a big talking point among runners, is emerging to be a key concern, though it has perhaps not yet reached a point where a majority actually considers pollution to be a deterrent.

That aside, what is it that makes a city a runner’s favourite and how do our cities measure up against each other?

Read more==>>http://citizenmatters.in/india-marathon-running-favourite-city-to-run-in-mumbai-delhi-chennai-or-bengaluru-5273

Read more

Featured Comments (0) |

Meeting a Legend – Linford Christie

Sandilya Venkatesh caught up with legendary runner, Linford Christie in New Delhi and he can’t stop smiling. 

Linford Christie is as large a man in person as his name is in the world of athletics. When he walks into the room he casts a shadow befitting his 6ft 2 inch frame which even at 57 years is in excellent shape.  I found a fitting definition to describe why he is a considered legend on Wikipedia

He is the only British man to have won gold medals in the 100 metres at all four major competitions open to British athletes: the Olympic Games, the World Championships, the European Championships and the Commonwealth Games.
I got a chance to catch up with him at a small dinner organised on the sidelines of the Airtel Delhi Half Marathon 2017 which he attended as the PUMA Legends Brand ambassador. The first thing I spoke to him about was his disqualification in 1996 at the Atlanta Olympics, where he was a favourite to win and was to be his swan song. I did regret leading with that statement of course, but the incredibly composed Christie fielded it with a beaming grin and poise. He did regret that he could not run that race, but chalked it up to the travails of the job – “That’s the sport – it happens sometimes” he said with such comfort and ease that one would think that it didn’t matter.
Training to be Christie
Fortunately, I moved on to his training and nutrition. With 3 – 6 hours of training every day, his routine was a grueling schedule. So much so that he would want to give up the sport every time he completed a meet. But like all good sportsmen, he would get back to the sport to continue the good work or I wondered aloud if he was a masochist? He laughs it off with equal ease. Interestingly, his nutrition was not anything much different during training as it was off. He doesn’t touch alcohol as expected. But he also doesn’t touch red meat and actively dislikes beef steaks. His primary protein sources are chicken and fish.
He continues to be built like a body builder – in his active years he was considered one of the most muscular sprinters and an example of a power athlete. Even though he was in full sleeved shirts or sweat shirts through out the weekend, his biceps were clearly visible and the size of shot puts. To the question on current fitness and exercise routine, he talked about how he is completely injury and pain free and continues to lift weights like people half his age in the the gym. That wasn’t surprising at all!
The legend now
For now, he enjoys contributing to the sport in the form of coaching and training. When asked about the nature of the sport and how it has changed, he talked about how everything has become so scientific these days and how that has unfortunately led to a lack of longevity of athletes. Usain Bolt however was the exception but also someone who, because of his sheer dominance of the sport, simply suppressed everyone else. Even though sprinters like Asafa Powell, Tyson Gay or Justin Gatlin were all outstanding athletes, they were unable to shine due to Usain’s undisputed presence, he opined.
He now spends a lot of time with “Street Athletics“, a sports initiative to get under privileged children into sport. For someone who has achieved such great heights in his sport, he is incredibly humble and down to earth. Talking to him, gives you a sense that you could win the Olympic gold too – if that’s not inspiring, then what is?
If you want to read more about Christie’s achievements you can visit https://goo.gl/GJcKK2
ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Sandilya Venkatesh is the founder of Eventjini and the Executive Editor of Finisher Magazine who is always excited about running and making others run.

Read more

Featured Comments (0) |

The World’s greatest Runner – Part 2

Continuing with our series on the world’s greatest runners, Capt Seshadri talks about Sebastian Coe and Steve Ovet, known for their incredible performance and speed.

We have two more runners for your this week. They have set the tracks on fire with their dedication, performance and running style.

Knight Runner

Trinity College, Cambridge, has a clock within the Great Court, that takes 43.6 seconds to strike the 12 chimes of noon or midnight. The 1981 movie Chariots of Fire features a scene in which the runners attempt to run around the perimeter of the Court, a distance of 367 metres, within this time.

Sebastian Newbold Coe, now Baron Coe, CH KBE,was once credited with having achieved this stupendous feat in 42.3 seconds, only two other runners having succeeded in doing so in years as far apart as 1927 and 2007. Unfortunately, even with sufficient time left, a video recording indicated that he was 12 metres short of the finish, and his name does not feature in the record books.

Lord Coe is a living legend. Now a British politician and the convener of the London Olympics, this former middle distance runner was born on September 29, 1956. Coe came into the athletics limelight in 1977, winning but barely missing out on the world record in the 800 metres European Indoor Championships in San Sebastian. In 1979, he set three world records within a space of 41 days, in the 800 metres, the metric mile and the 1500 metres and followed it with four Olympic medals in 1980 and 1984.

Seb Coe had a training schedule that was peculiar; successful for him and criticised by some as a ‘complete waste of resources’, while attributing his successes to ‘genetic ability’. His workouts included a huge amount of gym work with weights, concentrating on the lower body, back and shoulders, and systematic core building. Even in the early days, he believed in ‘circuit training’ with high reps and short recoveries. He was a staunch advocate of Pylometrics – the transfer of strength to power that was specific to running.

During the cold months, Coe would run at a moderate pace of 5 km, sprint uphill with long gaps of recovery and compete with sprinters to preserve the element of speed.He developed a reputation of pushing hard during the later stages of long runs, sometimes doing 16 km in ¾ of an hour.

Although there is not much information on his eating habits, his seemingly erratic methods of training provoked his detractors to observe that if his diet was like his training, he was probably drinking lots of soda and eating peanut butter sandwiches.

His rivalry on the track with Steve Ovett is the stuff of legends. Interestingly or rather, sadly, Seb Coe is colour blind.

The runner with the kick

Stephen Michael James ‘Steve’ Ovett, OBE, was born in Brighton, England on October 9, 1955. A champion middle distance runner, he won Olympic gold in Moscow in 1980, while also setting world records in the 1500 metres and the metric mile. In the mid 70s, the 1500 metres champion was a runner named John Walker; but in 1977, Steve Ovett shot to prominence with his regular wins over Walker. A great finisher, in the European Cup 1500 metres, he produced an unbelievable last lap of 52.4 seconds to pip his competitor to the post.

As a teenager, Steve was noticed for his prowess as a footballer, but reportedly gave up the sport, not wanting to indulge in a game where he would have to rely on his team mates. The ‘kick’ of football seemed however, to be part of his genes for, in the inaugural IAAF Athletics World Cup, with 200 metres left for the finish, he produced a tremendous ‘kick’, taking the last turn in 11.8 seconds and completing the final 200 metres in 25.1, leaving the rest of the field, led by John Walker, way behind him. It is recorded that Walker was left so surprised by this sudden kick that he simply stood and watched, dropping out of the race with 120 metres left to go.

Steve Ovett was coached by Harry Wilson, one of the best trainers of those days. In his book ‘Running My Way” Wilson describes, among others, Ovett’s methodical training schedule. A base of 24 weeks was broken down into 6 sessions of 4 weeks each, further classified into easy running, medium effort and hard aerobic running. In these 24 weeks, Ovett would average around 160 to 190 km per week. The intensity and speed would steadily increase with around 70% being done at a steadily medium pace, pushing hard at the end with the balance 30%. All this was combined with bouts of soft, anaerobic speed training.

Steve Ovett confesses that he had only one really tough opponent, although they raced against each other only six times. However, their competition and rivalry stayed firmly on the track alone; nothing was personal or political. To reproduce some quotes of Steve Ovett that immortalises this rivalry:

Make no mistake, when the gun was fired, both of us wanted to win as badly as the other and that’s probably what drove us on to achieve what we did.But when you look at his place in the history of middle-distance running now, Seb Coe is one of the all-time greats.From first-hand experience of trying to catch the bugger, he was the hardest to run against because every compartment of his racing technique was bullet-proof.”

Stephen Michael Ovett, OBE now lives in Australia, working as an athletics commentator with CBC. However, his legacy lives on in Preston Park, his home town of Brighton, where a bronze statue was erected in 1987. Twenty years later it suddenly went missing and was finally replaced with a copy in 2012.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

 

Capt Seshadri Sreenivasan is a former armed forces officer with over 30 years experience in marketing. He also a consulting editor with a leading publishing house. He is a co-author of the best selling biography of astronaut Sunita Williams

 

 

 

 

 

Read more

Featured Comments (0) |

The World’s Greatest Distance Runners

Capt Seshadri is looking at the world’s greatest distance runners in the first part of this series we present three of the all time greats.

Great runners have shown the world that challenges diminish against our spirit and endurance. In the first of the series, I am talking about runners who were so fast that they gained nicknames for their speed such as The Flying Finnn and the Czech Locomotive. These three runners have awed the world with their speed, skill and determination as they flew across the tracks to stamp their place in history.

The Flying Finn

Twenty two official world records at various distances between 1500 metres and 20 kilometres. Nine golds and three silvers in twelve events at the Olympics. Undefeated at distances of 800 metres and above for 121 races. And, spanning a 14-year career, unbeaten in cross country events and the 10,000 metres.

A non-conformist, both as an athlete and as a soldier, while the rest of his army colleagues walked, Paavo Johannes Nurmi ran with a rifle on his shoulder and a backpack full of sand. To strengthen his legs, he wore heavy boots and ran behind trains while holding on to the rear bumper.

Having made his international debut in the 1920 Olympics, Nurmi became the first and, to date, the only runner to hold the world record in the mile, the 5000 metres and the 10,000 metres at the same time. Such was his endurance and fortitude that he established world records for the 1500 metres and the 5000 metres within an hour of each other, and even won gold in these events in a space of less than two hours at the 1924 Olympics.  Apparently not satisfied with these achievements, he changed focus to longer distances, breaking the world records for the one hour run and the 25-mile marathon.

The Flying Finn later coached Finnish runners and pursued a career in haberdashery, construction and as a share trader. Nurmi, who would always run with a stopwatch in hand, is recognised for what is known as the “even pace” and credited with making running a major international sport, influencing the running styles of several future generations.

The Czech Locomotive

Working at the Bata factory at the tender age of 16, Emil Zatopek was asked by his manager to run a race against a hundred of his peers. Although initially reluctant to run, he came staggering in at second spot, which eventually drove him to train and excel in the sport. In 1944, a mere four years later, he broke the Czech records for the 2,000, 3,000 and 5,000 metres. In later years, Zátopek became the only athlete to win the 5,000 metres, the 10,000 metres and the marathon in a single Olympics. In fact, his last lap in the 5,000 metres was an astounding 57.5 seconds.

His quite audible wheezing while running earned him the monikers “Emil the Terrible” and the “Czech Locomotive”. While training, weather was never a constraint; snow never deterred him. His unique way of relaxing while running was to gently touch the tip of the thumb with the tip of the index or middle finger; the simple contact ensured that the arms and shoulders remained relaxed.

The Mathematical Finn

This police officer turned athlete employed the technique of the ‘emptying exercise’ of many top runners. This entailed pushing themselves to a total exhaustion or lack of energy level so that their bodies could once again receive more energy, enabling them to repeat their top race performances. At the infamous 1972 Munich Olympics, Lasse Virén won both the 5,000 and the 10,000 metres races. With less than 150 metres to go, Virén caught up with the leading pack after losing about 20 metres owing to getting tangled with other runners. Earlier, with 600 metres to go, Virén had already started an unprecedented lap-and-a-half kick, finally winning in record time.

Lasse Viren had a special running style that worked to his advantage. He ran all the bends very close to the inner edge of the first lane, which spared him tens of metres compared to his main competitors. This metre-saving practice is called ‘bend’ or ‘curve’ mathematics and is advocated even to this day.

 

The next part of the series will feature more inspirational runners who have motivated generations to take to the tracks.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

 

Capt Seshadri Sreenivasan is a former armed forces officer with over 30 years experience in marketing. He also a consulting editor with a leading publishing house. He is a co-author of the best selling biography of astronaut Sunita Williams

Read more

Motivation Comments (0) |

Half to Fifty

Arun Nair finds his way to the finisher of the The Malnad Ultra, Santosh Neelangattil, to understand what it takes to be an Ultra runner. 

It was Saturday morning when I packed my bags and drove towards Birur, a small town in Chikkamagaluru District of Karnataka. It was a pleasant ride through the national and state highways of rural Karnataka. I have had the opportunity to meet various running groups from South India and I had come to this location without understanding what an Ultra Trail entails. I meet a group of young runners and was pleasantly surprised when they mentioned that they trekked up a hill sometimes to go for a 10k run.

In a day an age when it is fashionable to say, ‘I am a runner”, I met  the unassuming Santosh Neelangattil. He did not look like someone who had completed a 50km race. A few excerpts from our conversation on all things running.

Congratulations on finishing your first Ultra run. How was the experience and how do you feel?
It’s exhilarating. Every kilometer after forty-two km was a milestone, as I was tracing them for the first time. Completing fifty km within the cut-off time and injury free was a significant achievement for me considering the condition of the trail. The experience was entirely different. A trail-run in a coffee estate! When I reached the place, it was dry all around. Rain in the evening changed the conditions altogether. It became slushy and slippery. It was even difficult to walk in some places. From planning for an ultra-run, it became an endurance run. After a while, I had to cross certain stretches by holding on to the coffee plant twigs. It was an unknown terrain as a lot of us were not sure on the depth of those slushy areas. At this point, the run got elevated from an endurance run to an obstacle run, and I was thoroughly enjoying it. It became all the more important for me to complete the run.

So in those tough conditions what kept you going?
It was the fellow runners and the volunteers! The seasoned ultra-runners kept encouraging and were giving bits of advice. The localities were providing unconditional support to all the runners by motivating us. By the way, I forgot to tell you about the leeches.

So how did this journey as a runner start for you?
This feeling of “Can I run?” started in 2006. I realized that I struggled to walk for one kilometer. I got a feeling that there were abnormalities in my health. Then I went through consultations, health check-ups, and supplements. I had to change. That’s when I heard about Sunfeast 10k run 2007. I practiced for it, and then I never missed Sunfeast or TCS run as it’s called now.

I love traveling. It was at this point that I decided to go for run-tour. So, my vacations and business meetings started getting planned around marathons. I have participated in several runs in last ten years – Kochi, Trivandrum, Goa, Mumbai, Delhi, Hyderabad, Jaipur, Madurai, Coimbatore, Cherrapunjee, Auroville (Pondicherry), Dubai, Australia and Sri Lanka. The beauty of my runs changed from health to the joy of running. My vacations will never be complete with two or three runs if not an event. I would go running on the beaches and explore new places which are otherwise not accessible on a vehicle. It became all the more interesting.

If you were to give a few tips to a new runner, what would you tell them?
‘Stay fit to run fit.’ When I started running, I was looking at finishing faster. That’s when a mentor, coach, and being part of a group helped me a lot. A renowned coach in Karnataka, Kothandapani sir, is my mentor. He just asked me one question, “Do you want to run for just this run or are you planning to run long?” Well, my answer was “I want to run long and run for many years.” I realized slowly that it was important to be fit to run. There was no point in getting injured and stop running. Then there were some outstanding seniors – Arvind, Ganesh, Subbu and the Team Miles Ahead (TMA) group gave me a lot of input on running safely without injuring.

For a typical one hour run, twenty to thirty minutes of warm-up and fifteen to twenty minutes of cool down post run is required. Warm-up and warm-down is something I know most of them miss out. It’s the most annoying part. We tend to get lazy when it is about warm-up as it’s not as exciting as running. My advice is simple, don’t miss your warm-up and warm-down.

For this particular Ultra Run was there any specific training preparation for it?
Longer training! Well, it’s also about conditioning my mind. If I have to advise runners for ultra-run – “If you can run ten km, you can run longer. Know your pace, listen to your body and don’t compete with others. You are your competition. No point in competing against anyone.” Do not experiment with your body unknowingly. Don’t harm your body to the extent that your day-to-day activities are affected. Run for the joy of running.

So when is the next race?
I enjoy my runs, and I know that there is always a new challenge. If you like to hear some numbers, (smiles) – my running app shows that I have completed 4500 km since 2014. Then there are many, that were not tracked. Tracking helps, and it motivates me. If you want me to be specific, my dream is to run Bangalore – Mysore, which is 150 km.

During our casual chat, he told me that there were days when he struggled to finish even 500 meters. There is something that I should personally learn, or maybe a lot of us should learn. As an irregular runner of short distance I know the struggle and it certainly felt good that even seasoned runners were not always motivated to run 10K everyday when they step out of bed.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Arun_Profile Pic

 

Arun K Nair loves to play cricket, volleyball, and shuttle. He participates in 10k marathons in Chennai and Bangalore and is the author of a crime novel.

Read more

Featured, News Comments (0) |

Berhanu Legese and Almaz Ayana win 2017 Airtel Delhi Half Marathon

–       Nitendra Singh Rawat wins in Elite Indian Men’s Category; breaks eight-year-old course record set by Deepchand Saharan in 2009 – 

–       L Suriya dominates Indian Women’s field and breaks course record set by Lalita Babar in 2015 edition –

The 2017 edition of the Airtel Delhi Half Marathon lived up to its legacy of being the World’s most prestigious half marathon, with Procam International announcing and delivering a slew of initiatives to be able to provide athletes with a better running environment.

 The race turned out to be a bag full of surprises as favourites made way for new champions. The Indians had a fabulous race with Indian elites Nitendra Singh Rawat and L Suriya smashing the course records in their respective categories.

Winner of 2015 Airtel Delhi Half Marathon Berhanu Legese repeated his feat on Sunday winning the Men’s Elite Category at 59:46. Making her half-marathon debut, reigning 10,000m world champion and world record holder Almaz Ayana beat the women’s field with 1:07:11.

Webp.net-compress-image

Ethiopia’s Berhanu Legese crosses the finish line in 59.46 seconds to win the overall men’s title at the Airtel Delhi Half Marathon, 2017 on Sunday.
Legese led Ethiopia’s 1-2 placing with compatriot Andamlak Belihu coming in five seconds later on his debut over the distance and American Leonard Korir came third clocking 59:52. 2017 IAAF World Championships Marathon gold medalist Geoffrey Kirui finished a disappointing sixth with a timing of 1:00:04.

 Delighted at his repeat feat, Legese said the weather conditions were perfect to go for the kill. “The weather was great, there was no issue at all. In fact, the weather was favourable for a run like this. I would love to come back to Delhi to participate in the event again,” said Legese, who clocked 59:20 to win the 2015 Airtel Delhi Half Marathon.

 Honourable Minister of State (IC) – Youth Affairs and Sports Col (Retd.) Rajyavardhan Singh Rathore flagged off the race. Airtel Delhi Half Marathon International Event Ambassador Anthony Ervin, PUMA legend  Linford Christie and Honourable Minister of State in the Ministry of Parliamentary Affairs and Ministry of Statistics and Programme Implementation Vijay Goel were present at the event.

Nitendra Singh Rawat took home the Indian Elite Men’s title beating defending champion G Lakshmanan in a thrilling photo finish (1:03:53). Rawat and Lakshmanan were neck-to-neck through the entire course. It was the last 100 metres when the real battle started as Lakshmanan and Rawat sprinted to the finish line. In what looked like Lakshmanan would go on and defend his title, Rawat pipped him at the post as his foot touched the finishing line before the defending champions. Avinash Sable came third with 1:03:58.

Webp.net-compress-image (2)

The Indian Elite Men Winners at the PD Stage of the Airtel Delhi Half Marathon, 2017 (L to R) 1st runner up G Lakshmanan, Winner Nitendra Singh Rawat 2ndrunner up Avinash Sable along with Chief Guest Ajai Puri, Director-Operations-Bharti Airtel, Puma Legend Linford Christie and Anthony Ervin-International Event Ambassador.

 Heading to the podium, Rawat, Lakshmanan and Sable also beat the course record set by Deepchand Saharan in 2009 of 1:04:00. Rawat said he had a point to prove by winning the race here. “I wanted to prove myself by winning this race so my strategy was to not take lead but keep going on until the end. This win will prove that I belong to the national camp,” said Rawat while speaking to media.

 Reigning world 10,000m champion Ayana was making her debut over the half marathon distance but hardly looked like a novice as she led home an Ethiopian clean sweep of the podium positions in the women’s race.

winner

Ethiopia’s Almaz Ayana crosses the finish line in 1.07.11 seconds to win the women’s overall title at the Airtel Delhi Half Marathon, 2017 on Sunday.
The outcome was decided in the final kilometer as she pulled away from her rivals. Ababel Yeshaneh was second again, as she was in 2016, and set a personal best for the second consecutive year as well, crossing the line in 1:07:19 to slice 33 seconds from her personal best. Completing the all-Ethiopian top three, Netsanet Gudeta also set a personal best of1:07:24 to improve her best by seven seconds.

 Asked how she felt to win her half-marathon debut, Ayana said, “There were not many good track competitions so I decided to participate in this event. I always run to win, and this race too wasn’t different,” said Ayana. When asked if she would come back to Delhi after making a winning debut, “Yes, I will come back next year,” Ayana said at her post-race interview.

 The Indian Elite Women’s category saw L Suriya clinching the top spot. “My coach Surendra sir told me to run my own race and maintain the pace throughout. I just did that but this wasn’t my best honestly,” said Suriya, who won the race by a minute. In the process, the 27-year old from Tamil Nadu set a course record with 1:10:31, beating Lalita Babar’s 2015 record at the event of 1:10:52Her performance should be good enough to secure her a place on the start line of the IAAF World Half Marathon Championships in the Spanish city of Valencia next March, which would be her first global championship outing.

Webp.net-compress-image (1)

The Indian Elite Women Winners at the PD stage of the Airtel Delhi Half Marathon 2017 (L to R), 2nd runner-up Parul Choudhary, Winner L Suriya & 1st runner-up Sudha Singh). 

 Veteran Sudha Singh came second with 1:11:30 followed by Parul Chaudhary at 1:13:09.

 The winners got richer by US$27000 while runners-up got US$20000 and third-placed runners earned US$13000. First placed Indian Elite athletes earned Rs. 3,00,000 with runners-up getting Rs. 2,50,000 and third placed runners winning Rs. 1,75,000.

 A course record jackpot of Rs. 2,00,000 will be shared amongst all three Indian Elite Men’s winners Rawat, Lakshmanan and Sable while L Suriya will have the entire sum to herself.

 Procam International expressed their gratitude to the Delhi Police, Government of Delhi and the runners of Delhi for their support and hands-on participation in ensuring the success of the Airtel Delhi Half Marathon held on Sunday. The mega event with a participation of over 34,000 would not have been possible without complete coordination and cooperation with the authorities.

 Following are the results:

Overall Athlete Men:

Berhanu Legese (ETH) 00:59:46; Andamlak Belihu (ETH) 00:59:51; Leonard Korir (US) 00:59:52; Asefa Negewo (ETH) 00:59:54; Jorum Okumbo (KEN) 00:59:58; Geoffrey Kirui (KEN)01:00:04; Edwin Kiptoo (KEN) 01:00:06; Abadi Hadis (ETH) 01:00:25; John Langat (KEN) 01:00:41; Nitendra Singh Rawat (IND) 01:03:53  

Overall Athlete Women:

Almaz Ayana (ETH) 01:07:11; Ababel Yeshaneh (ETH) 01:07:19; Netsanet Gudeta (ETH) 01:07:24; Helah Kiprop (KEN) 01:08:07; Worknesh Degefa (ETH) 01:08:09; Paskalia Chepkorir (KEN) 01:08:46; Veronica Nyaruai (KEN) 01:09:02; L Suriya (IND) 01:10:29; Daria Maslova (KYR) 01:11:28 Sudha Singh (IND) 01:11:28.

Overall Indian Athlete Men:

Nitendra Singh Rawat (IND) 01:03: 53; G. Lakshmanan (IND) 01:03:53; Avinash Sable (IND) 01:03:58; Durgabahadur Budha (IND) 01:03:58; Kalidas Hirave (IND) 01:04:07; Pradeep  Singh (IND) 01:04:34; Abhishek Pal(IND) 01:05:42; Man Singh (IND) 01:05:46; Govind Singh (IND) 01: 05:49;  Deepak Negi (IND) 01:12:48.

Overall Indian Athlete Women:

L Suriya (IND) 01:10:31; Sudha Singh (IND) 01:11:30; Parul Choudhary (IND) 01:13:09; Swati Gadhave (IND) 01:15:21; Dimple Singh (IND) 01:18:53; Meenu (IND) 01:19:23; Sindhu Yadav (IND) 01:21:13; Arpita Saini (IND) 01:21:20; Jigmet Dolma (IND) 01:26:53; Tsetan Dolkar 1:29:43

 Jabong Run In Costume results

Group

Adarsh Public School – Women Empowerment

Save the Children – India Equality for Women

Etasha Society – Empowering youth

Individual

Anshika Tanwar – River Replenishment

Bhavya Sharma – Animal Cruelty

Garvit Khanna – GST

Read more

News Comments (0) |